Career Management

Successful career development is more than doing a good job. Dressing for success, business writing skills, career networking – all are vitally important.

Business Management Daily’s succinct, workplace-tested career advice is designed to help you position yourself to succeed in your chosen field.

“The last sentence of an e-mail is like the last words of a phone call,” says Lynn Gaertner-Johnston, author of the “Business Writing” blog. So sign off with a courteous closing that suits the communication. A few examples:
Sometimes, it seems that persuading the boss—or anyone—to let you try your great idea is more difficult than ... well, just about anything. So, we asked three successful admins for their best tips on steering the boss toward agreement. Here they are:
Nearly 95% of consumers say free content is a major factor in helping them decide with whom they will do business, according to a recent ChiefMarketer.com study. So think about developing some free content for your site.
Each month, AdminProToday.com assembles a digestible collection of 1-minute strategies that help you save time and stress. Below are the 8 most recent time-saving tips:
Strip formatting from a Word document ... Work toward a big health goal one text at a time ... Make clutter disappear by turning each piece of paper into an action item in your planner ... Avoid information overload—and save time—by asking a specific, “micro” question ... Connect with people who want your cast-offs ...

I’ve long preached that employees should not enjoy an expectation of privacy in information they voluntarily place on the Internet, including social networks like Facebook. Now according to one federal court in Indiana, it is also fair game for employers to use social networking information when they have to defend against harassment and discrimination lawsuits.

What makes the Internet useful is also what makes it so undeniably distracting: There’s no end to what you can find online. Luckily, a few browser add-ons that work with Firefox can help make web surfers more productive (all available at addons.mozilla.org).

A reader recently wrote asking about the usage of “per.” It’s common to see sentences such as: “I’ve attached a copy of the contract, per your request.” Some reference books point out that “per” is correctly used to mean “by the,” as in “per hour.” And other guides recommend using more familiar English words.

Q. Is it OK for me to consider information about a job applicant that I learn by using Google, viewing Facebook pages and reviewing Twitter feeds?
You want to improve teamwork. So you reward group performance, praise any signs of collaboration and prod loners to become joiners. That’s a good start, but why stop there?