Career Management

Successful career development is more than doing a good job. Dressing for success, business writing skills, career networking – all are vitally important.

Business Management Daily’s succinct, workplace-tested career advice is designed to help you position yourself to succeed in your chosen field.

Colleagues may hesitate to share work if they’re not confident in your abilities. Here are some crafty ways to show ­others that you’re more than capable:
The latest technology trend? Going low-tech and “un­­plug­­ging” to get our most meaningful work done. Many are realizing we may need to take drastic mea­­sures to “switch off.” Here are some low-tech suggestions:
Stop monopolizing a conversation. Every time someone asks you a question, ask one in return ... Resist the urge to do several things at once ... Avoid sending an email to the wrong person, with this tip from Patricia Robb, author of the “Laughing All the Way to Work” blog ...
What don’t managers want from em­­ployees? Check out this list of flaws that describe unsuccessful em­­ployees, according to their bosses. The list was compiled by John Feather­­stone, author of Start Hiring Winners:
Being powerful doesn’t mean you’re brazen, pushy or trying to control anyone or anything. It simply means you stop focusing on how little power you have in a situation, and instead tap into your talent and determination to influence others to create better outcomes. Start using your skills to make your office or home better for everyone.

Instead of worrying about what di­­rec­­tion your life will take in one year or five years, keep your focus on three things—today. Ask yourself:

A growing body of research confirms what you may have suspected: Looks matter, especially when it comes to making a first impression on others. Surprisingly, though, it’s also the way people draw conclusions about our ability to do a job.

Grandmas are known for their nuggets of advice about bundling up in winter or baking a fruit cobbler. As it turns out, they know a thing or two about navigating the workplace, too. Pearls of wisdom from grandma:

Executive coach Joel Garfinkle quotes Peter Drucker as noting that past ­leaders knew how to tell, while future leaders would know how to ask. Here’s how Garfinkle advises asking others for feedback on your performance:

In business writing, you don’t receive extra credit for slathering your sentences with fancy phrases, the way you did in college. Do that in a memo or e-mail, and you can expect eyes to glaze over. Here are five "less is more" tips for writing more effectively at work.