Career Management

Successful career development is more than doing a good job. Dressing for success, business writing skills, career networking – all are vitally important.

Business Management Daily’s succinct, workplace-tested career advice is designed to help you position yourself to succeed in your chosen field.

Be careful if your employees are spreading the word online about your company’s products and services. Last year, the FTC issued new Enforcement Guidelines that require employees to disclose their relationships with their employer whenever they post comments or positive reviews about their employer’s product on a social media site.

What’s the best way to get a job right now? Networking. To reap the benefits of your network, you’ll first want to make sure it’s as strongly woven as a trapeze net. Start by effectively deploying LinkedIn. Susan Colantuono, CEO of Leading Women, says she uses LinkedIn in six ways to nurture her network:

At Deloitte, the annual report doesn’t stop with a financial statement. The financial services firm also publishes a “Talent Annuity Report” to chronicle its year in benefits and employee recognition efforts. “We published a Talent Annuity Report because we regard our talent as an investment that generates an annuity,” said CEO Barry Salzberg.

Following a speaking engagement for administrative professionals, I found myself listening to familiar comments. “My supervisor is so busy I never get a chance to have more than a two-minute conversation, and she never gives me feedback, so I never know what she is thinking.” In these circumstances you need to ask for what you need to be successful.

One of the country’s fastest-growing companies, LTC Financial Partners is looking for 300 new sales agents—and when those jobs are filled, more will open. Because the organization is constantly hiring, it’s also constantly trying to get new employees up to speed. So it created the LTC Insurance Training Institute to get recruits ready to work within five days.

Question:  “I often feel like an outsider in my office.  I am 61 years old, slightly overweight, and have gray hair. All my co-workers are in their 20’s and 30’s. The whole group goes out for “happy hour” once every six weeks. My boss’s boss came up with this idea, and he always attends. I usually avoid these get-togethers, because I don’t feel comfortable with the youngsters. Recently, a good friend said that this is a mistake. She believes my colleagues and managers will think that I’m snubbing them. I had a pretty good time at one happy hour, but I’ve skipped the last two.  Do you think I should start going?” — Old & Gray

When dashing off your next memo, report or e-mail, cut right to the core points. Readers see your writing as a reflection of how you think, so keep it direct and logical.

“The last sentence of an e-mail is like the last words of a phone call,” says Lynn Gaertner-Johnston, author of the “Business Writing” blog. So sign off with a courteous closing that suits the communication. A few examples:
Sometimes, it seems that persuading the boss—or anyone—to let you try your great idea is more difficult than ... well, just about anything. So, we asked three successful admins for their best tips on steering the boss toward agreement. Here they are:
Nearly 95% of consumers say free content is a major factor in helping them decide with whom they will do business, according to a recent ChiefMarketer.com study. So think about developing some free content for your site.