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Career Management

Successful career development is more than doing a good job. Dressing for success, business writing skills, career networking – all are vitally important.

Business Management Daily’s succinct, workplace-tested career advice is designed to help you position yourself to succeed in your chosen field.

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Dunder-mifflin Well, after many years in the job, Michael Scott has left the office at Dunder Mifflin to pursue other dreams. It remains to be seen how things are going to go for the team with the new boss.

You may or may not be surprised how often I hear in my coaching work about senior level bosses who are basically clueless. The cluelessness can show up in different ways – time sucking, pointless requests that come out of left field; no clear direction; much more emphasis on bluster and style than on the substance of getting things done. The list could go on and on. (Feel free to add your own observations on what makes for a clueless boss in the comments.)

As I wrote hear a few months ago, leaders can change the weather. If you’ve got a boss who is foggy and cloudy in their approach, it’s pretty easy for everyone on their team to show up foggy and cloudy. Obviously, that’s a pretty dangerous career situation for everyone in that boss’s organization. How do you help yourself and your team survive when you find yourself in a clueless boss induced fog bank?

Here are five things some of my savvy leadership coaching clients have done to survive a clueless boss:

Need to persuade a co-worker to embrace a new policy? Want buy-in from your supervisor to pay for your association fee? People are more likely to be persuaded when you share examples, references or testimonials from others they feel are just like them. It’s called Social Proof.
New research by web security firm OpenDNS says U.S. employers are mostly concerned with blocking employees’ access to social media, online games and personal e-mail. Here are the top 10 banned sites:
More than one-third (36%) of 500 HR professionals surveyed by OfficeTeam believe it’s “very likely” or “somewhat likely” that résumés will eventually be replaced by applicants’ personal profiles placed on social networking sites.
Don’t read too much into the recent foray by the NLRB into the brave new world of social media. Employees don’t receive a free pass on social media posts. They don’t have license to defame, disparage or otherwise trash their company, management, product or co-workers. Until the NLRB says otherwise, employers shouldn’t treat social media any differently than any other form of employee communications.

Two former Dow Jones executives have launched a business that hires economically disadvantaged single mothers and provides them with child care coverage and career development training. The organization’s founders call Moms and Jobs, or MoJo, “a social venture in a for-profit vehicle.”

Q. A supervisor recently asked if he was allowed to accept a subordinate’s “friend” request on Facebook. How should we advise our supervisors?

A 64-year-old receptionist in a Chicago doctor’s office—we’ll call her Jane—recently received an ultimatum: Do something about your thinning hair or be transferred to a job with less patient contact. Jane says, “I was absolutely devastated.” How far would you go to stay competitive by improving your looks?

These days, social networking—through LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter—is how many people make and strengthen their connections. Maribeth Kuzmeski, author of The Connectors, says that using a few simple rules of thumb can help make your social networking more efficient.
Q. If one of our managers overhears an employee discussing his genetic information, is our company liable under GINA?
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