Small Business Tax

Section 179 vehicles should be a key part of your small business tax deduction strategies. Can Section 179 property fit in with your business tax strategies?

Let Business Management Daily help you get each and every rental property depreciation credit and business tax deduction you’re entitled to.

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Do you need extra cash to pay for your child's (or your own) college tuition? When you've exhausted other conventional sources, you can turn to your IRA in a pinch, even if you're younger than the age generally required for penalty-free distributions.

Normally, you must depreciate the cost of business or commercial real estate over 39 years. In comparison, you can depreciate residential rental property much faster over 27.5 years.

Unless you're a CPA or a tax nerd, the term MACRS can be daunting. It stands for Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System, which is the standard federal-income tax method for depreciating the cost of your business assets.

Pity the late Albert Strangi. He tried to save his family from estate taxes by transferring the bulk of his assets into a family limited partnership (FLP). But the IRS stepped in and nixed the tax benefits.

It's not very often that the IRS lets you pull down tax-free income. So, take advantage of such opportunities when they pop up.

All work and no play can make Jack (or Jill) a disgruntled employee or client. So, you may decide to treat some of your top customers or valued employees to an outing as the summer draws to a close. By knowing the tax-law rules for entertainment costs, you can double your pleasure with top-dollar write-offs.

A business that operates heavy-duty vehicles must pay a heavy tax when it hits the road: the heavy-duty vehicle use tax (also called the federal "highway use" tax).

If you operate a manufacturing company and need to clean up land contaminated with hazardous waste, how do you treat the cleanup costs for tax purposes? The IRS clarified that issue in a new ruling last month. (IRS Revenue Ruling 2005-42)

It's not too often that we advise you to turn up your nose at a tax break. But if you're selling real estate this year, you may want to pay more tax than required up-front. Why? Because you'll end up ahead of the game in the end.