Profiles in Leadership

Page 7 of 17« First...67810...Last »
Thanks to Mike Duke’s detail-mindedness with data and scheduling, Lee Scott thinks his successor as Walmart CEO is a better manager than he was himself. “Mike is not only a good leader but a really good manager,” Scott says.

Jeno Francesco Paulucci always did what he thought was right. The food magnate once walked out of a $40 million deal with Reynolds Tobacco because he thought its executives were arrogant. He hired “unemployable” ex-convicts and people with disabilities because he thought they deserved a chance. Nobody’s special, he would say. “We’re all the same. Just because you have a little more money doesn’t make you any better.”

R.A. Dickey’s career was failing. A pitcher in the major leagues, he struggled on the mound. To compensate for a ligament problem in his pitching arm, he was in the midst of reinventing his pitching style. Not only did he reinvent his pitch, he made it something unique—the knuckleball.

Chief executive Dan Akerson is making progress in steering GM toward a common vision and chipping away at the old bureaucracy. Here’s how Akerson is trying to turn things around.

Few men in politics have been admired by both sides of the aisle. Former Secretary of State Colin Powell is one such man. In his memoir, It Worked for Me: In Life and Leadership, he offers up rules to live by.

Joe Coulombe still has his fingerprints all over Trader Joe’s. Founder of the food store that bears his name, Coulombe is responsible for the good selection of dried fruits and nuts, as well as the Hawaiian shirts employees wear. Other trademarks are less visible.

If you stick to your ethics 10 out of 10 times, you won’t regret where you end up. The challenge is in defining for yourself where you stand, and drawing a clear line.
Bell Labs was among the most innovative scientific organizations of the 20th century. The man at the helm was Mervin Kelly, a physicist who led the laboratory. Follow his lead for inventing the future.

Growing up, no one considered Harry Truman a leader. He was a kid with thick glasses who mostly stayed home, working the farm or reading. But the course of his life changed when he entered the Army during World War I. One rainy night, he faced a moment of true terror.

How did a young man from Cocoa Beach, Fla.—a place not known as a surfing haven—become the greatest surfer of all time? Luck? No, unbelievable drive and determination.
Page 7 of 17« First...67810...Last »