Profiles in Leadership

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In 2000, Robin Chase founded Zipcar. The car-sharing service was an instant hit; within three months, the firm had 400 members. Chase was about to secure new funding to grow the business when she crunched the numbers and realized her business model was seriously flawed ...
As a top executive at Merrill Lynch and TD Ameritrade, Joe Moglia's employees viewed him as a supportive yet demanding boss who prodded them to excel. But Moglia gravitated to a career in finance only after abandoning a rewarding stint as a football coach. And then came the day when he decided to go back to the gridiron.
For Brian Walker, leadership and inspiration go hand in hand. The CEO of Herman Miller wants the company’s roughly 5,700 employees to love their jobs, so he reminds his staff that the company’s goal is “to create a better world around you.”
Think your job is complicated? Consider what’s on Patrick Walsh’s plate. He’s CEO of AirSign, a company that provides airplane advertising and skywriting to clients ranging from corporations like Google to a guy who wants a memorable way to propose marriage.
Do you know about what happened when Richard Feynman testified at a hearing on what caused the Challenger disaster? His brief display became a legend in how to powerfully convey a point.

In 2004, Lego was losing roughly $1 million a day. The once-legendary Danish toy maker was on the brink of collapse. It hired a new CEO, Jorgen Vig Knud­­storp, who quickly drew two conclusions: The company needed to cut costs dramatically and start delivering products that customers actually wanted.

When Jay Gould joined American Standard in 2012 as CEO, he faced a liquidity crisis. Draining cash, the once-venerable plumbing company was on the brink of collapse. The company's 5,500 employees had gotten used to layoffs, and there was little reason to believe more weren't coming. Gould needed a way to boost morale, and he found it.
In early 2006, Avinash Kaushik worked in data analytics at Intuit. After giving a talk at an industry conference, some influential attendees suggested he start blogging. Kaushik liked the idea, but prepared carefully before diving in. How did he so quickly become a thought leader read around the world?
Here are three points of advice from Dal LaMagna, the guy who launched more than a dozen businesses, sold Tweezerman to J.A. Henckels, and now is CEO of countertop manufacturer IceStone.
During the 2008-09 recession, Jim Goodnight of SAS didn’t just promise job security to his workforce. He also challenged them to use the slowdown to innovate. Housed on 300 acres in Cary, N.C., the tech giant’s campus offers its 14,000 em­ployees a chance to concentrate on ­creativity with a minimum of distractions.
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