Records Retention

You need record retention guidelines – from organizing personnel files and electronic records retention policies to control document management and more.

Business Management Daily provides personnel records retention guidelines, helping you to improve your hard-copy and electronic record retention.

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To sue for employment discrimination, employees have to show some sort of adverse action—e.g., discharge, demotion, a pay cut or a transfer to a less desirable or less prestigious position. Merely being criticized or having a reprimand placed in a personnel folder isn’t enough to support a lawsuit.

About 11,000 more federal government workers telecommuted in 2009 than in 2008, the federal Office of Personnel Management reports. The increase brings the number of government employees who work at home or at telework centers at least part of the time to 5.72% of the federal workforce.

American workers can access the Internet, email, instant messaging and other forms of electronic communications from anywhere at anytime. While electronic communication helps people do their jobs, it also leaves a trail. A telephone conversation relies on the memory of two participants, but email and IM discussions can be preserved for years to come. And, given the casual way so many people fire off email these days, that can spell legal trouble for employers.

If your employee handbook has been gathering dust, now’s the time to update it. Start by doing a quick audit. Spend a half-hour today ensuring your handbook meets these six criteria.
Under the FMLA employers routinely ask an employee’s health care provider to complete a certification form justifying FMLA leave requests. That could create a GINA compliance problem, because the certification might reveal genetic information about the employee. There are obvious precautions that an employer should take to comply.
Every summer, enterprising teens turn up in droves seeking employment at businesses all across the country.  As much as teens might want to be treated like adults, employers would be remiss to do so. Reason: Treating teen employees in the same manner as you treat adult employees could result in a violation of federal law.
Given the low cost and the easy accessibility of electronic records storage, many employers are making the digital leap to “paperless” HR. But despite the many benefits of going paperless, a host of legal problems could derail even the best-intentioned digital records plan. Carefully consider these legal issues when transitioning to an electronic personnel records system.
Given the low cost and the easy accessibility of electronic records storage, many employers are making the digital leap to “paperless” HR. But despite the many benefits of going paperless, a host of legal problems could derail even the best-intentioned digital records plan. Carefully consider these legal issues when transitioning to an electronic personnel records system.
No company can function without maintaining a variety of records. To control this massive proliferation of files, you must develop a records management system that you can refer to daily to decide what you must keep and what you can toss.
Maintaining personnel records used to be a whole lot simpler. In fact, any HR department that wanted to be absolutely safe on the subject simply issued a “keep everything” policy. But now, that same “keep everything” strategy can cost you as much as a lawsuit. Maybe even more.
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