Records Retention

You need record retention guidelines – from organizing personnel files and electronic records retention policies to control document management and more.

Business Management Daily provides personnel records retention guidelines, helping you to improve your hard-copy and electronic record retention.

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Should your organization buy a computer, pay for Internet access and maintain the equipment that your teleworkers use in their home offices? The federal government recently authorized its agencies do all of that for their teleworkers. And that may be the smart play for your organization, too ...

Your unique vantage point in HR equips you to identify managers with the potential to become company leaders. By sharing your insights with top execs, you'll help build organizational excellence and make yourself more valuable. Use these tips to alert top execs to possible future leaders they might be missing ...

Q. Are we required to let terminated employees come in and view their actual personnel files, or can we copy the information and send it via mail? One of our fired employees has hired an attorney and wants to see her file. —T.M. California

Q. I support the concept of permitting employees to view their personnel files upon request, but I want to know if any law or regulation requires us to provide access. If so, where can I find out about this law/regulation? I’ve been unable to find the rule, and I’m beginning to suspect that we’ve passed this “law” around so long in HR that we believe it exists. –R.C., Alabama

More employers are requiring employees to solve employment disputes through arbitration. But courts are quick to invalidate mandatory arbitration agreements that don't meet the letter of the law. Don't back off mandatory arbitration because of legal uncertainties; just make sure to follow these seven rules ...

One wrong move (especially during the firing process) can send employees running for courthouse. Teach supervisors to avoid unnecessarily angering employees by pointing out the following common mistakes ...

If you think that you can forget about a discrimination dispute just because the employee doesn't file an EEOC complaint within the allotted time, you may be in for a surprise. As a new court ruling shows, the EEOC can sue your organization years, or even decades, after the alleged discrimination took place ...

You know to keep employees' health records confidential and locked away. Yet some HR professionals and supervisors aren't so cautious when it comes to in-house talk of health information. Use the following court case to remind supervisors about the legal dangers of such gossip ...

When dealing with difficult employees, supervisors often go the extra mile to document their interactions (and any discipline) in case the employee ever sues. But does this extra effort at documentation provide proof that the supervisor intends to discriminate? ...

Q. We don't allow our employees to read or comment on their evaluations. Instead, we discuss the content with them one-on-one and have them sign an acknowledgment that they have discussed their performance. Do we have to show them the actual evaluation or give them a copy?—D.J., Michigan