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Payroll Management

Ineffective payroll management and shoddy payroll systems can result in personal liability (including JAIL TIME) for non-compliance.

Business Management Daily helps our readers with information on payroll processing and tips on timesheets that will help you to implement payroll programs that pay off.

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Question: What should an employer do if a client requires the employer to obtain new I-9 forms from all employees who will be working on the client’s premises?

Question: If employees don’t have List A, B or C documents and must use replacement receipts to verify their identify and work eligibility, when can the employer create a case file in E-Verify?

Now that the Supreme Court has upheld the legality of the Affordable Care Act, your first responsibility under the law is to ensure that for open enrollment periods beginning Sept. 23 employees receive a summary of benefits and coverage (SBC) and a glossary that defines basic health benefit terms.

It’s no secret that a large contributor to the tax gap—the difference between the taxes that are paid and the taxes that are owed—are independent ­contractors who don’t have taxes withheld from their payments. B Notices, properly called CP 2100/2100A notices, which require payers to backup withhold, are a key tax collection tool.

Payroll has no margin for error. Get employees’ pay wrong and you’ll hear from them. Get your tax deposits wrong and you’ll hear from the IRS. Get it right and what do you hear? Silence. But don’t think you toil in anonymity.

If you can’t show your time records are accurate, lawsuits claiming unpaid over­­time can get costly. That’s because—absent reliable employer records—courts will let employees fill in the timekeeping details. Make sure your records are easily ex­­plained and tamper-proof.

How can an employer reduce its exposure to claims for off-the-clock work if employees use their own electronic devices for business purposes?

To pay for health care reform, high earners—single employees earning more than $200,000 and joint ­filers earning more than $250,000—will pay an additional 0.9% in Medicare taxes, for a total tax rate of 2.35%, beginning Jan. 1, 2013. The IRS has issued “Questions and Answers for the Additional Medicare Tax” to provide guidance.

As the hot, sticky air of summer clears out, now is the time for you and your employees to do some clearing out of your own. The payoff: A smoother year-end Payroll ­process.

Question: We run a rural health clinic. We know that payments made under certain programs that encourage health care professionals to work in underserved areas are tax-free. Do these payments fall into that category?

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