Office Management

Who’s there to organize the office organizer? Business Management Daily helps admins with dealing with bosses, records retention, and other key tasks.

We provide thousands of articles to help admins and office management staff through better meeting management, improved time management, and much more.

Disputes between co-workers and between employees and their bosses are almost inevitable—which is why every HR professional must know how to gather the necessary facts to find out what’s going on. Take some time to think about and plan your inquiry even for simple, seemingly routine issues. If the situation is complicated or raises a red flag about possible legal claims, a well-planned investigation can be critically important.

We recently reported that workers are packing their lunches more often. Packing lunch is definitely more affordable. It can also offer a way to lessen your carbon footprint. Laurie Cleary, of Lunchville.com, says “by making small changes, like carrying reusable lunch containers, we can make a big impact in reducing waste.”

“Corporate social responsibility” has become a popular concept and buzzword, driving many companies to reach out to the communities that surround them. Admins often lead those efforts. Example: At Imperial Sugar Company’s sugar refinery, admin Charmaine Ordeneaux recently co-chaired a fundraising effort for the American Cancer Society.

Here are five feng shui tips for a harmonious and productive office: 1. Position your desk so that you’re facing the entrance of your office or cubicle. 2. Move your desk to the right or left of the door ... 3. Make sure you have proper lighting. 4. Increase the air quality in your workspace by adding plants. 5. Choose office colors to reflect the kind of energy you desire.
How do admins bring value to their roles? We asked administrative assistant Eileen Behr, who recently won the 2010 OfficeTeam Administrative Excellence Award. Here’s how she brings a “value-added” focus to her job:
As an HR professional, you have an open door. And you’re always encouraging employees to ask questions about their benefits. But sometimes, that door needs to be shut … and so should your mouth. As a new lawsuit shows, repeating even the question asked by an employee can trigger a multi-claim lawsuit …

Even though the economic climate remains tenuous, most employers will continue to offer the same number of paid holidays to employees in 2011 as in past years, says a new Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) survey. Here is the breakdown of each holiday ...

Without admitting any wrongdoing, the Ohio state government has settled a religious discrimination suit brought by three former members of the Workers’ Compensation Council. The three workers will split $55,000, plus $15,000 in attorneys’ fees after they were fired in February by Council Director Virginia McInerney.

Q. Our policy lets employees carry over up to 100 hours of unused paid time off from year to year. We would like to change the policy to permit employees the choice between cashing out paid time off and carrying it over into the next year in order to encourage them to reduce their paid time-off accruals. Is this a problem?
A former clerical worker is suing a San Francisco Bay Area-based trucking company, claiming he was harassed and subsequently fired for asking about medical benefits for his same-sex partner.