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Office Management

Who’s there to organize the office organizer? Business Management Daily helps admins with dealing with bosses, records retention, and other key tasks.

We provide thousands of articles to help admins and office management staff through better meeting management, improved time management, and much more.

Q. We recently sent an employee home for not following his supervisor’s instructions. Do we have an obligation to pay him for the full day regardless? How should we handle this situation in the future? Is this considered administrative leave?
Abusive managers may be workplace monsters, but their behavior generally hasn’t subjected employers to liability if no particular protected class was the target of the abuse. That may be about to change in New York.
Managers, supervisors and HR professionals, beware: Courts are cracking down on employers that punish employees who serve in the military. One way is by clarifying that those who participate in hiring and firing decisions may be held personally liable for violating USERRA.

You no doubt take sexual harassment complaints seriously and promptly try to learn the facts. But which facts should you consider when deciding whether the conduct creates a hostile work environment? Look at the totality of the circumstances. For example, comments that aren’t directly sexual can still contribute to a hostile environment if the context indicates that the comments are related to others that are sexual.

Sometimes, you don’t know how lousy an employee was until he or she is gone. That may be when you find out about missing work, or even missing money. Or you may discover that the employee was essentially dishonest. If that’s the fact, promptly document what you discovered—just in case there is a later lawsuit.

If there’s one thing all HR pros share, it’s probably a love/hate relationship with paper and paperwork. You know you need good records, but you also need to get rid of them periodically. That’s what a records-retention schedule will help you do.
Question:  “Our store manager and assistant manager recently ended an extramarital affair after the assistant’s wife discovered it. Everyone at work had been aware of the relationship for quite awhile.  Although they’ve agreed to stop seeing each other, the situation is still very uncomfortable. Our regional boss just wants the whole thing to go away. Sales have improved since these two started working together, so he doesn’t want to transfer either of them out. We’ve been told that any employee caught gossiping about the affair could be terminated. The assistant’s wife is furious that management won't force a transfer, but she doesn't feel that she can speak up. I would like to contact human resources on her behalf, but I’m afraid of getting in trouble. What should I do?” — Disturbed
Sometimes, it seems that persuading the boss—or anyone—to let you try your great idea is more difficult than ... well, just about anything. So, we asked three successful admins for their best tips on steering the boss toward agreement. Here they are:
End your week on a positive note every Friday with these three work habits—and set the tone for the following week:
End your week on a positive note every Friday with these three work habits—and set the tone for the following week: