Office Management

Who’s there to organize the office organizer? Business Management Daily helps admins with dealing with bosses, records retention, and other key tasks.

We provide thousands of articles to help admins and office management staff through better meeting management, improved time management, and much more.

When dealing with difficult employees, supervisors often go the extra mile to document their interactions (and any discipline) in case the employee ever sues. But does this extra effort at documentation provide proof that the supervisor intends to discriminate? ...

Q. We don't allow our employees to read or comment on their evaluations. Instead, we discuss the content with them one-on-one and have them sign an acknowledgment that they have discussed their performance. Do we have to show them the actual evaluation or give them a copy?—D.J., Michigan

A reader of our weekly e-mail newsletter, The HR Specialist Weekly, recently posed this question: "We allow employees to take paid time off (PTO) in hourly increments, but they often use their PTO when running late in the morning or for unexpected 'appointments.' How can we get a rein on our PTO leave?" ...

White Paper published by The HR Specialist, copyright 2009 ______________________ The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), which became law in 1993, provides qualified employees with up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave per year for the birth or adoption of a child, for caring for a spouse or an immediate family member with a […]

When you rattle off your employee benefit offerings to prospective employees, what raises their eyebrows? It's probably not the basics: People have come to expect health/life/dental, 401(k), etc. What really catches a prospect's attention are the creative perks that prove your organization has their interests in mind ...

The keynote speaker just wrapped up his presentation. “Any questions?” he asks. Silence. Most people are hesitant to break the ice and ask a good question, but you should.

The federal Fair and Accurate Credit Transaction Act (FACTA) of 2003 says businesses that negligently or purposely allow employees’ or customers’ personally identifiable data to fall into the wrong hands can face fines of up to $2,500 per infraction ...

Q. I recently discharged an employee for performance problems. At the end of the termination meeting, he asked for a copy of his personnel file. Do I have to give discharged employees a copy of their personnel files? —B.N.

When employees sue your organization, you must turn over any related documents—including old e-mail messages and computer records—during the discovery phase. But be aware that recent changes to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure place an even greater burden on you to come clean with what information you have ...

Sponsors of 401(k) plans have a fiduciary obligation to prudently select and monitor their plan's investments, investment options, and third-party service providers. Understanding and evaluating fees charged by those third parties are key components of a fiduciary's responsibility. Employees also have a right to know the fees their plans pay to third-party service providers. Hammering this home, class action lawsuits have been filed against some of the country's largest employers. The lawsuits allege that plan sponsors breached their fiduciary duties by allowing third parties to charge unreasonable fees to their plans. As is inevitable, lawsuits of this type reverberate with employers of all sizes. Now is a good time to assess the fees charged to your plan.