Office Management

Who’s there to organize the office organizer? Business Management Daily helps admins with dealing with bosses, records retention, and other key tasks.

We provide thousands of articles to help admins and office management staff through better meeting management, improved time management, and much more.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division recently announced that MT Supermarket, an Austin grocery store, has paid $186,624 in back wages to 34 workers. The payment comes after an investigation of the Asian grocery store found violations of the FLSA.

It’s not surprising that employees and employers can view the same circumstances differently. Consider, for example, the following case, in which an employee thought she had been replaced and promptly left. She was entitled to unemployment compensation based on her reasonable belief that she had been fired even though her employer never told her so.

Last month, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced the issuance of Notices of Inspection (NOIs) to 1,000 employers across the country associated with critical infrastructure, alerting business owners that ICE will audit their hiring records to determine compliance with Form I-9 employment eligibility verification laws.

If I had to boil employment law into one overarching maxim, it would be this: Be fair and document everything, in case someone thinks you’re not being fair. If you doubt the importance of thorough documentation, consider two recent cases decided by the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals.

If you hold a meeting and nothing gets done, what's the point? To avoid wasting time, begin by setting a clear expectation.

Both the ADA and the FMLA have strict requirements for how employers must handle employee’s confidential medical information. HR professionals must know these rules to comply with both laws—and to avoid expensive legal liability for failing to do so. Here are the details you need.

As the holiday season begins, so begins the inevitable answering of questions from confused employees regarding holiday pay issues.  Typically, misconceptions abound, with employees mistakenly believing they are entitled to much more than they really are.

Q. One of our employees is out sick and has already used up all her sick leave hours. Can we legally subtract from her vacation time instead?

Cherryville-based R-Anell Housing has agreed to a $200,000 settlement with the EEOC after the company refused to hire female applicants. According to the EEOC, the modular home building company maintains a sex-segregated workplace that “has the effect of denying female employees equal employment opportunities.”

Question:  “Our office manager constantly takes aim at minorities and older employees. After we sent an anonymous letter to the human resources manager about this woman’s prejudiced behavior, he posted a notice saying only signed complaints will be investigated. If we sign our names, we know the manager will retaliate.  She has a history of firing people who protest her heavy-handed tactics, and her boss wholeheartedly supports her. If human resources won’t consider our complaint, what can we do?” — No Way Out