Office Management

Who’s there to organize the office organizer? Business Management Daily helps admins with dealing with bosses, records retention, and other key tasks.

We provide thousands of articles to help admins and office management staff through better meeting management, improved time management, and much more.

Lavish office parties are as distant a memory as mimeograph machines for most workers. This year, as companies cinch their belts a little tighter than usual, how are you handling the holiday office party? Administrative professionals weighed in with their suggestions on our Admin Pro Forum:

Disputes between co-workers and between employees and their bosses are almost inevitable—which is why every HR professional must know how to gather the necessary facts to find out what’s going on. Whether it is a small inquiry or a weighty investigation into serious allegations of misconduct, being deliberate and intentional about an investigation will create a more helpful and less disruptive process.

Halloween may be over, but “ghost work”—the work left behind after colleagues are laid off—still haunts the employees who remain. According to a recent survey by the International Association of Administrative Professionals, admins are hit particularly hard by the spectre. Here are three tips to help you gain control of "ghost work":

Question: “I’d like to update my Microsoft Office skills. If I have limited staff development funds, but would like to get some advanced training, which program would be the most beneficial to me and the company? In other words, what’s the best bang for the buck?” — Anonymous

A key part of the ADA is the so-called “regarded as” rule. Essentially, it says that if your organization treats an employee as if he or she is disabled, then the employee earns the job protections provided under the ADA—even if he or she isn’t truly disabled. What does it take to “regard” someone as disabled? It can be as simple as jotting “disabled” on an application or employee paperwork.

A progressive discipline system is the best way to correct employee performance problems. It’s also the best way to protect against wrongful termination lawsuits. It allows you to ensure that any employee fired because of inferior performance was treated fairly and in accordance with your company’s policies. Here’s a five-step model for progressive discipline:

FedEx is under fire yet again for classifying its drivers as independent contractors.  The attorneys general (AG) in Montana, New Jersey, and New York sent a letter to FedEx last month notifying the company of their intent to sue over labor law violations that have resulted from the company's continued misclassification of drivers.

Help attendees convert decisions into action after the meeting ends. Here’s how:

Question: “What would be a few good agenda items to discuss at our next administrative professionals meeting?  No one really wants to say anything, and therefore, the individual departments do not share any new ideas or updates on their activities. Do you have any sample agendas to share?” — Victoria

If facing potential fines for violating the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) isn't enough to motivate companies to maintain accurate payroll records, then they should be motivated by the fact that the courts will base an unpaid overtime award on the employee's records of their hours worked — even if the records are inaccurate and an overestimation. (Really, how many employees will underestimate their hours worked?)