Office Management

Who’s there to organize the office organizer? Business Management Daily helps admins with dealing with bosses, records retention, and other key tasks.

We provide thousands of articles to help admins and office management staff through better meeting management, improved time management, and much more.

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Question: Brigette, an experienced administrative professional is thinking about starting a Career Management business for admins.  She asks, “If you’re thinking about changing careers, what information would help you change careers, move up the ladder, or enhance your visibility and responsibility within your company?” — Brigette

According to the 2010 MonsterCollege Survey from Monster.com®, 81% of the 1,250 future graduates surveyed expect to graduate with at least one internship under their belt, up from 77% in 2009.  Combine a growing desire for real-world experience with tight workplace budgets and you've got all the makings for a wage-and-hour disaster.

The costs of employee absenteeism—reflected in lost production, overtime and temporary replacements for the absent worker—can add up quickly. What’s the best way to combat the problem? With a clear policy, careful documentation, consistent application of the policy and progressive discipline.

The first rule of negotiating a raise is to make it easy for your boss to say yes. That means anticipating objections and addressing them in advance. Smart negotiators rarely say, “I want more money.” Instead, they use facts to drive home their valuable contributions. Here’s how to prepare for your next salary review:

Q. An employee asked to review her personnel file, and we let her. Now she wants us to change a discipline notice she found in the file. We don’t have to do that, do we?

Q. We offer employees a set number of paid time off (PTO) days per year, which they may use for any reason, including vacation and sick days. Must we pay out all earned but unused PTO days upon termination?

Not everyone who has a learning disability or even mild retardation is disabled. Under the ADA, every disability is measured by the individual’s condition and whether or not the condition he claims is disabling substantially impairs a major life function. Thus, someone with minor intellectual deficits may not be disabled under the ADA.

Question: “Our office is moving to bigger and better premises, and the Managing Director has appointed me Office Manager. I have been his personal administrative assistant. I have no managerial experience, so I’m looking for advice on what my role should entail and how I can become a good manager. I will be overseeing the receptionist.” — Tatjana

Asking for a raise right now is an uphill battle. There still isn’t “enough money around to compensate people for the extra hours they’ve been putting in,” says Ravin Jesuthasan, head of the global rewards practice at Towers Perrin. But it could be the perfect time to ask for a perk.

The ADA requires HR and employers to maintain strict confidentiality on any medical- or disability-related information. That means keeping it in a separate, secure file, away from prying eyes that have no business viewing the information. But confidentiality doesn’t apply just to paper or electronic records. Employers also have to make sure they don’t discuss such information with those who don’t need to know.

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