Office Management

Who’s there to organize the office organizer? Business Management Daily helps admins with dealing with bosses, records retention, and other key tasks.

We provide thousands of articles to help admins and office management staff through better meeting management, improved time management, and much more.

Page 100 of 260« First...10203099100101110120130...Last »

Employees who are fired shortly after complaining about a manager’s supposed discriminatory attitude may assume that the complaint led to the termination. And they’re almost sure to sue. To stop such lawsuits from going far, make sure the manager in question has nothing to do with the final decision to terminate. That’s good advice even if you don’t think he or she did anything wrong.

Plenty of organizations offer flexible schedules, allow telework and let parents slip out early once in a while to catch a child’s soccer game. But in many workplaces, those benefits are perks that only managers and white-collar workers enjoy. Yet several studies show that when low-wage employees have some flexibility in their hours, teamwork improves and unscheduled absences abate. If your organization’s lower-wage employees are candidates for flex, consider these eight strategies.

According to a 2007 survey from Salary.com, Americans waste about 20% of their time at work. And a chunk of that wasted time comes from surfing the Internet. One journalist writer, in a quest to find out where her time was going, tried out four online services that track productivity. Here's what she learned from that experience.

Your gut tells you to wait a day before sending an angry e-mail or to stay away from the rumor mill. That’s your intuitive intelligence, says best-selling author and UCLA psychiatrist Judith Orloff. By checking in with your intuitive coach, she says in her book Second Sight, you end up making better on-the-job decisions and navigating office politics masterfully.

Some employees think they can behave like jerks at work without any consequences—as long as they don’t harass co-workers. You don’t have to put up with that kind of nonsense. Instead, institute clear rules against such behavior. Put them in your employee handbook. Then enforce those rules—up to and including firing those who just won’t change their ways.

Question: Brigette, an experienced administrative professional is thinking about starting a Career Management business for admins.  She asks, “If you’re thinking about changing careers, what information would help you change careers, move up the ladder, or enhance your visibility and responsibility within your company?” — Brigette

According to the 2010 MonsterCollege Survey from Monster.com®, 81% of the 1,250 future graduates surveyed expect to graduate with at least one internship under their belt, up from 77% in 2009.  Combine a growing desire for real-world experience with tight workplace budgets and you've got all the makings for a wage-and-hour disaster.

The costs of employee absenteeism—reflected in lost production, overtime and temporary replacements for the absent worker—can add up quickly. What’s the best way to combat the problem? With a clear policy, careful documentation, consistent application of the policy and progressive discipline.

The first rule of negotiating a raise is to make it easy for your boss to say yes. That means anticipating objections and addressing them in advance. Smart negotiators rarely say, “I want more money.” Instead, they use facts to drive home their valuable contributions. Here’s how to prepare for your next salary review:

Not everyone who has a learning disability or even mild retardation is disabled. Under the ADA, every disability is measured by the individual’s condition and whether or not the condition he claims is disabling substantially impairs a major life function. Thus, someone with minor intellectual deficits may not be disabled under the ADA.

Page 100 of 260« First...10203099100101110120130...Last »