• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Dealing with Bosses

Even a good boss is a challenge. But when you’re dealing with bosses, dealing with difficult bosses makes everything twice as hard.

It can often feel as if you’re the one managing the boss. Business Management Daily shows you how to transform you and your boss into an efficient, unstoppable team.

Page 4 of 15« First...34510...Last »
A frustrated admin recently vented on our online forum: “I’m at my wit’s end!" None of the managers was “participating” in her attempts to keep the office organized. Our advice: Start over by telling managers how a tracking system ben­efits them.
Your boss has a “hands-on” work style that demands all files stay nearby. So how do you help a boss whose office is drowning in paper? Here are tips for organizing a paper-strewn office:

When a friend becomes the boss, the power shift can bring on strong emotions and conflict. To avert problems—and to save your friendship—keep emotions out of the way and focus on strengthening your new professional relationship:

Whether your office has sophisticated scheduling software, day planners for everyone or no formal calendar management at all, a few visual reminders can keep everyone running on time...
In recent rulings, the Supreme Court clearly signaled its unwillingness to tolerate even the appearance of circumventing the nation’s anti-discrimination laws. Employers must have investigative procedures in place to help guide decision-making when an employee could be disciplined or terminated.
Many business leaders are clueless about how they come across to their employees. Your mistakes could be crushing morale, sinking productivity and increasing turnover. Accord­ing to a recent Wall Street Journal report, here are five key questions to ask yourself to see if your management skills need improving:

Sometimes, HR professionals have to make judgment calls about who is telling the truth. In fact, just about every workplace investigation requires assessing the credibility of employees, co-workers and managers who disagree about what happened. Take, for example, an employee who complains about a supervisor’s harassment or hostility.

After 20 years of being a secretary, writes one administrative professional, she knows how to do the necessary work. That hasn’t kept her current supervisor or her supervisor’s boss—both women—from berating and intimidating her. The admin asks, “How can I learn to stand up for myself in a professional manner?”

You hear a lot about bullies and bullying these days, especially in schools. But bullies grow up. If they’re not stopped, they bring intimidation and violence into the workplace. What’s worse, some of them will become supervisors. If you get wind of a potential bully boss, here’s what to do:

Bad managers are not consciously aware that they’re bad managers. And if they are aware of it, they’re probably not willing to admit it to anyone. Nobody wants to think they might be the problem. Here are a few clues:

Page 4 of 15« First...34510...Last »