Dealing with Bosses

Even a good boss is a challenge. But when you’re dealing with bosses, dealing with difficult bosses makes everything twice as hard.

It can often feel as if you’re the one managing the boss. Business Management Daily shows you how to transform you and your boss into an efficient, unstoppable team.

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When you’re overloaded, you have two choices: work more stressful, 12-hour days or create a plan to tell your boss that enough is enough. Here’s how to stand up for yourself with tact and professionalism:
If you want your boss to accept your idea, you must choose your approach carefully. You can’t control everything that will affect—or prevent—your boss’s approval. You can, however, increase your chances for success by asking yourself certain questions.
Your relationship with your boss can be good, bad or somewhere in between. Knowing the signs of a dysfunctional relationship can help you decide whether it’s worth working on or if you should just move on, career consultant Jennifer Winter writes.

A new boss can introduce a lot of new elements to your work life, such as a new leadership style, a new way of communicating and new expectations. Career coach Joyce E.A. Russell offers these tips to help you cut through your anxiety and start adjusting to your new reality.

Chronic complainers can kill mo­­rale, hurt productivity and drive you nuts. Author Linda Swindling identifies five types of complaining bosses and explains how to handle them.
Sometimes it can be hard to strike up a conversation with your boss about something other than your assignments, but you really should make the effort. Five topics you may want to weave into conversations with your boss:
All administrative professionals I work with have more on their plate than ever before. If you’re going to grow the number of executives you serve, yet the number of people supporting that growth remains the same, you may reconsider and start empowering your executive.
Here's a real-life list of actual assignments that bosses have dumped on their workers, according to employees surveyed by CareerBuilder.com.

Whether it’s deciding what to eat or what to wear, making decisions drains mental energy, writes Robert C. Pozen. Assistants who free their bosses from having to constantly decide on things can easily be­­come indispensable.

No matter what level you’re at, adopting these three behaviors is sure to impress your boss, Ora Shtull writes.