• LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google+

Dealing with Bosses

Even a good boss is a challenge. But when you’re dealing with bosses, dealing with difficult bosses makes everything twice as hard.

It can often feel as if you’re the one managing the boss. Business Management Daily shows you how to transform you and your boss into an efficient, unstoppable team.

Page 12 of 14« First...10111213...Last »
Do not be afraid to stand out or fail
Q. I saw a co-worker steal valuable office supplies. Should I keep quiet or tell someone?
I knew a guy with a great résumé. He had technical expertise, a nice mix of job experiences and a steady work history. He interviewed well, too.
Q. I’ve worked here one year, and I’m struck by the poor quality of management. Is this enough of a reason to leave?
Fred Abrew, 62, became CEO at Equitable Resources Inc., a Pennsylvania utility company, after nearly 40 years of climbing the corporate ladder. He served as CEO for three years, leaving in 1997 with a “golden parachute” worth $1.35 million. We spoke with Abrew about his steady ascent to the top:
Change never lets up. And convincing your staff to embrace constant change keeps getting tougher.
You know the rules and you try to obey them. But company policies and procedures can sometimes suffocate your team.
You dread going to work. The problem isn’t your job, which you love. And you’re blessed with a great staff. But your boss makes you miserable.
Career advancers seize initiative and shape their destiny. They set shortand long-term goals and take steps to attain what they want, rather than pout and wait for good things to happen to them.
In the past five years, many managers have adopted “open-book management” as a way to teach employees to link their jobs to the company’s larger financial performance. This way, staffers can see how their efforts directly affect the bottom line.
Page 12 of 14« First...10111213...Last »