Team Building

In most companies, when you get results, you get rewards. And if you can’t lead teams to success, you’ll end up stuck in a job with no exit. Use this strategic blending of common-sense strategies and implementable team building exercises to build and bolster your winning team…

You want to improve teamwork. So you reward group performance, praise any signs of collaboration and prod loners to become joiners. That’s a good start, but why stop there?

Make sure your team is working more like the Manhattan Project and less like Enron… Use these articles, exercises and strategies to get your team building training up and running!

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Team-building exercises seem to be falling out of favor, yet several college basketball programs have turned to Navy SEAL-inspired regimens they hope will steel players for a run at the Final Four.
Cross-training—the process of having employees learn coworkers’ jobs—is an excellent way to boost productivity and develop employees’ skills.
Audiences respond well to speakers who share inspiring stories. By forging an emotional tie to a famous victory, you’re more apt to deliver a memorable message. Consider how Gary Spitzer, a senior vice president at DuPont, rallied hundreds of employees at a company event.
Po Bronson—The New York Times best-selling author of Top Dog: The Science of Winning and Losing—is a big fan of using small teams to tackle big projects. But surely the smaller the team, the more critical the role of the team leader, right? Wrong.

Congratulations! You’ve been appointed to lead a new team. The key to team leadership is knowing how to pull back and let the group gel. Follow these tips.

Groups collaborate more effectively when individuals learn from each other. Give them a chance to pair up—so that they share their expertise—and you’ll build a stronger team.
Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn, frequently borrows a phrase from legendary Duke basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski, who likes to say “next play” after every sequence on the basketball court. It’s a way to focus players on what they need to do to succeed.
For decades, management experts have praised Jack Welch as a model leader. The former CEO of General Electric was famous for firing the lowest-rated performers every year, causing employees to compete with each other to retain their jobs. John Mackey, co-CEO of Whole Foods Market, rejects that approach.
In just over a decade, the Tufts University men’s lacrosse team has gone from worst to first under head coach Mike Daly. Instead of focusing on wins, Daly urged players to take pride in mastering the details and always improving their craft.
Choosing the best solution calls for thoughtful discussion and judgment. Avoid these two potential traps:
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