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Team Building

In most companies, when you get results, you get rewards. And if you can’t lead teams to success, you’ll end up stuck in a job with no exit. Use this strategic blending of common-sense strategies and implementable team building exercises to build and bolster your winning team…

You want to improve teamwork. So you reward group performance, praise any signs of collaboration and prod loners to become joiners. That’s a good start, but why stop there?

Make sure your team is working more like the Manhattan Project and less like Enron… Use these articles, exercises and strategies to get your team building training up and running!

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"What do you mean I have to work on the floor today?" Margie asked sharply. "I have this project you gave me, remember?" Hank sighed heavily. "I know, but Mr. Banks denied our request for temporary help. With Rosanna and Martha out, we need all hands. I'm going to be out there, too."

When a workgroup is really a "team," its members are neither independent nor interchangeable, but interdependent. Each member has a role to play that contributes to the overall performance of the team. And one of the most challenging aspects of team building is figuring out what those roles are and should be.
"If you're not good at relationships, you can and will fail." That's according to change-management consultant Morris R. Shechtman, author of Fifth Wave Leadership: The Internal Frontier. "When you care enough about people to invest in a caring, honest, challenging relationship with them, you breed accountability."
As a hands-on manager, you're in the perfect position to fight boredom at work. This means you can head off the mistakes, missed opportunities, absenteeism and turnover that result when work becomes too routine. Here are some techniques to try:
One of your roles as a team leader is that of project manager. But like many of your leadership roles, this is one you can share with your team—and in the process, improve the quality of your own efforts while developing your team members' skills and competencies.
There's no better way to find out how well your team is performing (and whether you're getting better or worse) than by asking the people you serve. Whether these customers are inside or outside the organization, they can provide more important information than any other possible source.
When training supervisors, stress that they must work harder to prevent workplace intolerance toward employees with physical or mental impairments.
Reason: More courts are allowing employees to use
the ...
It's not that hard for an apparently solid team to break apart into a collection of cliques. Here's how you can stop this problem before it starts:
In her new book, Contagious Success: Spreading High Performance Throughout Your Organization, Susan Lucia Annunzio identifies three characteristics that "consistently distinguish high-performing workgroups around the world."
Your team is made up of talented people, each of whom can excel individually. But the team's collaboration, decision making, and problem solving aren't what they could be; usually, you end up making the important moves. Why? And what to do about it?
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