Performance Reviews

For most managers, conducting effective performance reviews is the most daunting part of their job. Don’t look on it with dread! Make your performance appraisals work for you, not against you with these tools: performance review examples, tips on writing employee reviews, sample performance reviews and employee evaluation forms.
So, your tasked with assessing employee performance and writing performance reviews. Where do you get started?

See more scripts and strategies for writing performance reviews and conducting valuable employee appraisals. Get a sample performance review and employee evaluation forms when you sign up for our Free email newsletter for Leaders & Managers like you…

Page 52 of 105« First...102030515253607080...Last »

You’ve been fired, laid off, rendered redundant. Yet, no matter what the reason you were released, you never saw it coming. Here are lessons you can learn from a job loss—or prepare yourself for that possibility—so you can more easily dust yourself off and land the next job.

Sometimes, employees who think they are about to be fired for poor performance will try to take pre-emptive action by quitting and then suing. Courts are pretty strict when it comes to “constructive discharge” ...

You’d think terminating someone for obviously gross misconduct and behavior that was simply unacceptable would be a slam-dunk. No chance such an employee could bring a lawsuit, right? Wrong. There’s always the potential for a discrimination suit ...

Sometimes, you find out pretty quickly that someone you hired isn’t going to work out. While the final decision to terminate may take some time, many supervisors naturally start giving the cold shoulder to bad hires. Such a blow-off may be crass, but it’s not the kind of behavior that commonly puts an employer on the losing end of a lawsuit.

If your performance evaluation is at least six months away, start tracking now the value you bring to your job, especially if you want a raise. That’s according to David Lorenzo, managing partner at The Gallup Organization and author of Career Intensity.

At first glance, the federal ADEA appears rather straightforward: It protects people age 40 and older from employment discrimination based on their age. But the law can affect just about anything managers do, from asking questions in job interviews to assigning job duties ...

Gone are the days when employers could accommodate employees’ religious practices by being flexible about who worked Saturdays and Sundays. Today, employers may have to offer additional prayer breaks in the middle of the workday, too ...

Some disabilities get worse with time. An accommodation that allows an employee to perform the essential functions of her job today may not work as well in six months or a year. That’s why it’s important for HR to stay on top of the employee’s disabling medical conditions ...

Employees who claim they have been discriminated against because of a protected characteristic such as age or disability have to show that they suffered an adverse employment action. They can’t simply point to a poor performance evaluation.

Employees who have been terminated don’t have long to file a complaint about alleged discrimination. Employers that suspect they might be sued can capitalize on the short statute of limitations by starting the clock as soon as possible. Here’s how ...

Page 52 of 105« First...102030515253607080...Last »