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People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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Your newest team member, Sharon, generally does a good job of keeping the work flowing in her area. But of course, nobody's perfect ...
Studies show that nearly all the time most managers spent on "people work" is divided between their best performers and their worst ones. The people in the mid­dle end up fending for themselves. Though difficult to avoid entirely, the problems that complicate the management of the work of average performers can be resolved.
In 1973, the U.S. Army training manual outlined a leadership philosophy called “Be, Know and Do.” Over the years, a number of leaders have credited that philosophy for their success. Here’s how you can apply it:
Definite guidelines help clarify expec­tations and prevent wasted effort. Managers who can put appropriate rules in place and see that they are followed create an important edge for themselves and their teams.
The "we" approach is far more satisfying, productive and effective than handling employees as a col­lection of separate individuals.
Without built-in motivation, work is just a job. But with it, work becomes an extension of a team member's personal­ity, values and desire for success and satis­faction.
The ability to engage and motivate employees, followed by the ability to communicate, are the skills that organizations want most in their leaders, says a new study by Right Management Consultants.
Both Rob and Lisa are good employees, and Maurice knew that when he hired experienced people, he gained access to new ideas. He didn't want to discourage them from sharing those ideas—just to understand when and how they should do so. Here's what Maurice told them:
Over the long term, managers have a number of options for improving the performance of chronic slackers—or cutting them loose entirely. But in the heat of a crisis, the options are more limited.
It seems simple to set rules regarding punctuality, expect workers to follow them, and resort to discipline when they don't. But often, tardiness is a symptom of bigger problems that, left unaddressed, will keep you from ever getting people working on time. Here's what to do:
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