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People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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You hired Wendy because she came highly recommended from a similar job at another company. She learned the ropes, but continued to make lots of mistakes because she couldn't let go of old habits ...
Think of the last time one of your people criticized you. Perhaps it was only implied, but you got the idea. Read these four constructive responses.
Learning to quantify performance goals can take time, but it's a skill worth mastering. Quantified goals help you plan effectively, evaluate your people efficiently and eliminate uncertainty.

You hang your coat on the rack and glance at your inbox. Sure enough, there's the product satisfaction survey Ishmael conducted for you. As you expected, it's an immaculately prepared report, neatly bound, with evidence of Ishmael's effort and expertise on every page. Unfortunately, it took two weeks of his time—far more than it's worth.

What should you do when an employee gives you two weeks' notice? Help write a happy ending with these steps:
Your newest team member, Sharon, generally does a good job of keeping the work flowing in her area. But of course, nobody's perfect ...
Studies show that nearly all the time most managers spent on "people work" is divided between their best performers and their worst ones. The people in the mid­dle end up fending for themselves. Though difficult to avoid entirely, the problems that complicate the management of the work of average performers can be resolved.
In 1973, the U.S. Army training manual outlined a leadership philosophy called “Be, Know and Do.” Over the years, a number of leaders have credited that philosophy for their success. Here’s how you can apply it:
The "we" approach is far more satisfying, productive and effective than handling employees as a col­lection of separate individuals.
Without built-in motivation, work is just a job. But with it, work becomes an extension of a team member's personal­ity, values and desire for success and satis­faction.
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