People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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When employees possess a growth mindset, they embrace learning, and they don’t fear failure. As a result, they are able to take beneficial risks, recover more quickly from set­­backs and continuously improve themselves. The good news is that you can help employees to develop a growth mindset by responding to challenges and failure with phrases like these.

How can you detect and solve problems being experienced by employees who don’t speak up? Try this approach.
Looking to correct a problem employee? Here are four tips.
Have you ever gotten so tired of hearing someone complain about doing a particular task that you just stopped assigning it to him?
If you have an uncooperative employee, the following guidelines can help you resolve the problem.
Micromanaging employees lowers their morale and productivity, while also eating up too much of your precious time. It is a habit you need to break. But how do you know if you are a micromanager? If you regularly say the following, you’re likely one.

If someone doesn’t mirror your preferred communication style, it’s tempting to label that person a poor listener. You may look for ways to avoid working with that individual. Yet in many cases, two people with mismatched personalities can still collaborate well. Jessie Kahnweiler learned that lesson.

It may surprise you that the first item on the list of ways to get people to come to work more often is to encourage dissent. 

Leading employees who have a greater level of expertise in certain areas than you has its challenges. After all, you can feel insecure, and they can resent having to answer to a supervisor who isn’t on their same level. Follow this advice.

It’s a common scenario in the workplace: An ongoing dispute between two employees. Left unchecked it can split your whole unit into factions. And your workers may be looking at everything you do in terms of which side you seem to favor. Here are some guidelines that can help you address employee conflicts in a positive, effective manner.