People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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There is sometimes only a thin line between diligence and delay—but you can always tell when employees have crossed it.
What can you do to stave off that toxicity before it overwhelms the place you live five days a week?
Speaker and author Jay Forte is a results-oriented kind of guy, so he doesn't think you have reason to worry that remote workers might become underperformers—as long as everyone knows what's expected from day one.

When employees possess a growth mindset, they embrace learning, and they don’t fear failure. As a result, they are able to take beneficial risks, recover more quickly from set­­backs and continuously improve themselves. The good news is that you can help employees to develop a growth mindset by responding to challenges and failure with phrases like these.

How can you detect and solve problems being experienced by employees who don’t speak up? Try this approach.
Looking to correct a problem employee? Here are four tips.
Have you ever gotten so tired of hearing someone complain about doing a particular task that you just stopped assigning it to him?
If you have an uncooperative employee, the following guidelines can help you resolve the problem.
Micromanaging employees lowers their morale and productivity, while also eating up too much of your precious time. It is a habit you need to break. But how do you know if you are a micromanager? If you regularly say the following, you’re likely one.

If someone doesn’t mirror your preferred communication style, it’s tempting to label that person a poor listener. You may look for ways to avoid working with that individual. Yet in many cases, two people with mismatched personalities can still collaborate well. Jessie Kahnweiler learned that lesson.