People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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PROBLEM: A small group of your employees gathers in an open area during their lunch break to have a group prayer. What would you do in this situation?
Tell bad employees that they’re great and they will be, says a study conducted by the Zenger Folkman leadership development consultancy.
They’re getting their work done somewhat, but you’re just not quite sure if they’re taking advantage of the situation and getting sidetracked with something else. That hasn’t happened at N2 Publishing.
Check out this cartoon about a manager's thoughts on staff commitment.
Some workers think that anytime their employer criticizes an emotional state or suggests therapy, the employer is “regarding” them as disabled. Thus, goes the argument, the employer violates the ADA when it tries to intervene.
Every team seems to have employees who have the capability of moving up to a higher position, but they just lack the confidence. Here' s a plan you can use to help them develop it and get ahead.
Sometimes, a manager’s crew includes night shift workers, people who are usually out of sight. They can also slip out of mind too. It takes a special effort to give those workers who are rarely seen the guidance they need to succeed and feel valued. Here’s how to handle it.
There is sometimes only a thin line between diligence and delay—but you can always tell when employees have crossed it.
What can you do to stave off that toxicity before it overwhelms the place you live five days a week?
Speaker and author Jay Forte is a results-oriented kind of guy, so he doesn't think you have reason to worry that remote workers might become underperformers—as long as everyone knows what's expected from day one.