People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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What skills does a great leader possess? Charisma tends to fade over time. And strong-willed bosses who try to intimidate may seem formidable at first, but employees often resist tyrants. Nine traits of effective leaders:
For the millions of Americans who suffer from gastrointestinal problems, the workplace poses special challenges.
Employees are no longer functioning at peak performance in the modern workplace, reported best-selling author and performance expert Tony Schwartz. To help managers and employees, he developed a diagnostic tool, “The Energy Audit,” which measures how individuals are coping in their work environments.
Americans spend up to 20 percent of their waking hours on social media sites. According to Mashable, use of social media at work is costing companies up to $650 billion in profits per year, so employers have good reason to be concerned. But how can a company protect itself while maintaining good relationships with its employees?
How many times have you heard someone say, “He was the best boss I ever had”? Team members are motivated working with a boss whom they like and admire.
According to a Catalyst research report, women experience slower career growth and slower rates of pay increase than men, even as corporate officers in Fortune 500 companies—even in 2013.
HR Capitalist Kris Dunn displays an “outlandish” handwritten note as an example of recruiting that catches top performers.
Before you address a roomful of employees, identify the main point you want to make, then figure out a memorable way to convey it. Consider how Jack Welch, GE’s former CEO, injected some drama speaking to his top managers. 

The armed forces rely on logistics, and so does Amazon. Over time, it dawned on the online retailer that the people so capably running its 34 warehouses have a military “bias for action” as well as hands-on experience in moving stuff around.

As a leader you can tell people what to do. But barking orders rarely endears you to your team. A better way to instruct and inspire staffers is to share personal anecdotes.