People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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Retired Lt. Gen. Frank Kearney was deputy commander for the U.S. Special Operations Command. The three-star general helped oversee 62,000 people with a $10 billion budget.
It’s important to be able to trust the people you work with day in and day out. It can, however, be hard to communicate this trustworthiness to others.
When more than one employee is implicated in a rule violation, make sure all employees are disciplined equally. That’s especially true if they have the same supervisors and similar disciplinary histories.
No state or federal law requires you to establish a progressive discipline policy. If your organization has one, however, make sure all your supervisors understand and follow it.
What if you made your organization's mission statement into something more like a pre-game locker room speech?
As CEO of Cleveland Clinic, Delos “Toby” Cosgrove had earned a sterling reputation as a longtime leader in the health care field. After gaining international fame as a pioneering heart surgeon, Cosgrove took the top job at the prestigious Cleveland Clinic in 2004.
No state has passed a law that outright bans bullying at work, and only one has come close. Yet don't let that stop you from forging ahead with your own anti-bullying program.
In the three and a half years that Marissa Mayer has run Yahoo, many of her key executives have quit. In October 2015, Mayer implied that those who left Yahoo lacked certain skills.
If you ask Doug Tieman to describe his leadership style, he’ll give you two answers. When he wants to inspire employees to excel, he sees himself as a cheerleader. But when crises erupt and he seeks to reassure an anxious workforce, he acts like a mule skinner.
Consider these hesitancy-reducing strategies when asking your team to broaden their horizons.