People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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When talking to friends and family, nearly three-quarters of working Americans (72%) say they refer to the organization where they work at as “we,” while only 20% refer to it as “they,” according to a Kenexa survey.
Google, the king of search engines, recently set out on a search of its own—to identify the qualities that make the highest quality managers at Google Inc., and then to replicate those qualities across the entire company. The end result: a simple, yet ele­gant, list of eight management practices that the best Google managers consistently do.

Managers should make documentation of employee performance, behavior and discipline a regular habit. Strong documentation is especially important if an employee or ex-employee ever files a legal complaint saying his or her termination or discipline was based on illegal discrimination.

The effects of the recession have helped turn the spotlight on innovative employers that seem to have magic formulas for attracting and keeping their employees happy and productive despite the economic forces around them. SAS Institute and Google are two examples of companies that, consciously or not, have tapped into new ways of motivating employees. Call it “employee enrichment.”
Frances Hesselbein, who led the Girls Scouts of the USA from 1976 to 1990, was named the “Best Nonprofit Manager in America” by Fortune magazine. But what makes her truly remarkable as a leader isn’t that so many people think of her as an outstanding leader. What’s exceptional is the way she gets others to think of themselves as leaders.
You already know to scold employees in private. You don't want to embarrass them at the same time that you're criticizing some aspect of their performance. But reprimanding in private doesn’t excuse you from speaking diplomatically.

More than ever, work is collaborative. And where do things go wrong when it comes to collaborative work? At the handoff. It’s usually not because someone is incompetent or lazy; it’s due to poor communication. The bottom line: We all need checklists. Use or adapt this “handoff checklist” when delivering a project assignment, suggests the Harvard Business Review blog.

While many people gripe about their jobs from time to time, few are converting words into action. When it comes to hunting for a better position elsewhere, most of us don’t bother, according to a survey by Accenture.

At the low point of the recent recession, managers who let their guard down lost a chance to uplift their employees. Fretting, exasperated supervisors left their subordinates feeling like helpless victims. To alleviate swirling anxiety at work, open the floodgates so that people can commiserate in a supportive environment.
With gasoline prices averaging near $4 per gallon, many employees are struggling to keep their tanks filled. For some, the added cost makes it hard to get to work each day. Are your employees sweating the gas price crisis? Is your organization doing anything to help relieve employees’ gas pains? Tell us your story.
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