People Management

With some employees, it isn’t a matter of ability, it’s a matter of attitude. And while you can’t control someone’s horrible personality, you can decide how you’re going to respond. Use these scripts and strategies to confront problem employees and effectively manage employee discipline so you can bring motivating back to the forefront of your workday.

The first rule of people management is not to let one bad apple spoil your whole bunch. Difficult people can put a strain on the productive members of your team.

Make the most of your human capital. Browse our articles on the good, the bad and the ugly of People Management…

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Many leaders measure their success on how well they get people to like them. They view their staff as customers—and take steps to curry favor with them. Colin Powell rejects that approach.

When 1,000 employees hear a CEO fire someone on the spot, fear spreads among them. It lowers the odds that they’ll take prudent risks to benefit the company—and increases the odds that they’ll play it safe and shift into a mindless, order-taker mode.
When it comes to giving criticism, many managers have been taught to use the “sandwich” approach: Start with a positive statement, present the problem or concern, then finish with another upbeat sentence or bit of praise. But because the technique is so familiar, workers often view such conversations as insincere. Learn a better way to give constructive criticism.
Every manager should have an up-to-date employee manual on hand that outlines company policies and procedures.
Managers often complain they have too much work, yet many of their employees believe that they themselves are underused and aren’t given opportunities to learn new skills. So it’s a good idea to ask yourself, “Am I delegating enough work?”

You wake up with a stuffy nose and body aches. Going back to bed sounds appealing, but there’s a staff meeting today, you’re already behind on that big project, and you have 20 emails waiting for responses. This is a tricky situation.

By publicly scolding an employee, you may feel like you’ve sent a loud-and-clear message. But it comes at a risk: A solid contributor might quit. Joel Manby offers a case in point.

Bob Lutz spent many years as the No. 2 executive at big car companies, working closely with the CEO. He learned how to get along with his bosses while correcting their blunders.
If Americans were taking a new job and had their choice of a boss, they would prefer a male boss over a female boss by 35% to 23%, although 40% would have no preference, according to a new Gallup poll.
Say one of your employees walks into your office all red-faced and angry. How should you respond? Follow these do’s and don’ts to help em­­ployees vent about stressful work problems and think about solutions:
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