Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

When you hear "negotiation," what comes to mind? When I ask this question at seminars, women often respond: men in suits arguing and yelling; buying a car; attorneys. When I ask how many women enjoy negotiating, only a few hands go up. Yet in reality, women are born to negotiate.

John Adams was a founding father and second president of the United States, but perhaps his greatest acts of leadership were in recommending George Washington to be president, and John Marshall a justice of the Supreme Court.

While you’re Managing by Walking Around, throw in a dose of Managing by Walking in Their Shoes. The entire nation has witnessed what leaders can learn by spending time on the front lines, thanks to reality show “Undercover Boss.”

Sheena ­Iyengar and her fellow researchers at Columbia Business School set up a tasting booth near the entrance of a store, putting out either six choices of jam or 24 choices. They found that people were six times more likely to buy a jar of jam if they had only six choices versus 24. What are the implications for business leaders?
When an executive team held a strategic planning meeting and considered options, the company founder jumped up and proclaimed their ideas worthless: “The only people in this room that aren’t idiots are the engineers who graduated from Carnegie Mellon and Caltech.” That left out more than half the team.

Roughly 85% of MBA graduates believe that “business people are well-qualified to solve the most pressing problems of the world,” according to the Passion & Purpose MBA survey. So, what does that mean for you? They want to work for leaders who share their passion for changing the world.

Great bosses aren't born, they're made. Becoming a great boss requires honest self-analysis and periodic reassessments. The following check­­list was designed to guide you in that analysis. Use it to take stock of your people skills. Be honest with yourself.

David Ben-Gurion, founding father and first prime minister of Israel, based his leadership on prioritization. He did this for two reasons: He thought that adhering strictly to priorities was the right way to lead, and he believed the complexities of working in a coalition dictated that you couldn’t deal with even two things at once.

Nobody argues the fact that Robert McNamara was a genius. The Ford Motor Co. whiz kid who led the Pentagon into the Vietnam War, and the World Bank into unprecedented expansion, solved problems with sheer brains. But McNamara’s flaw may have been that, in a larger sense, he just didn’t “get it.”

In his latest book, management thinker Jim Collins tried to get at how com­panies thrive amid chaos. Some winners cut against common wisdom.