Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Food & Friends has a low turnover rate (more than 70% of employees having been with the nonprofit for at least five years). Among the firm’s retention strategies: “Kudos” are read at weekly staff meetings.

Most improv performers could tell you about this crucial rule of great improv: You’ve got to listen to your scene partner. Otherwise, you may miss an important cue or the opportunity to collaborate on a creative idea. It’s the same in the workplace. Here’s an improv activity that’s worth a try:

Flexibility and use of technology are key in managing men and women born between 1980 and 2000.
How to deal with managing the constant complainer.
Leading from the top down no longer makes sense in the rapidly changing workplace. The most effective management style includes meaningful, ongoing collaboration between managers and employees.
Management tips to ease stress in the workplace: As a team leader, you’re uniquely positioned to influence workplace conditions and keep the people in your unit as productive as they can be. Here are tips to reduce stress levels.
Whether a manager is good or bad is often in the eye of the beholder. As such, the key to becoming the best manager you can be starts with identifying the management style that fits and complements your unique personality and skill set. Here are three management styles to consider, along with the benefits and drawbacks of each:
The other day, I overheard employees chatting in the hall. One said, “At least it’s Wednesday. Only two days till the weekend.” Another added, “Yeah, I can’t wait to say TGIF.”
You may be LinkedIn, but is the talent within your organization linked? When talent can more easily collaborate—and when workers know how to tap into one another’s strengths—the whole organization benefits. Here’s what it looks like in action:
Anne Stevens was the first board member at Lockheed Martin who took a flight in an F-16 with the chief test pilot. “I actually took control of the plane, did loops and rolls, and then the pilot pulled nine Gs," she says. "I was the only woman he was able to pull nine Gs with."