Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

In the simplest terms, strategy is about figuring out where to play and how to win to maximize long-term value. To define your business strategy, answer these three questions:

Every year, you probably receive (or help write) your performance evaluation. But have you really evaluated your job lately? Doing a “career audit” is a way of asking yourself: How is my position actually working for me? We talk you through the questions you need to ask yourself.

Say you're trying to use an Excel spreadsheet to track weekly wages for office employees. It's simple enough to create a formula (hours x hourly rate) that calculates wages for someone who works 40 hours or less. But what if someone works 45 hours one week?
How to leverage older employees’ skills and experience to build your team.
Follow these guidelines to deliver effective and efficient performance reviews.
Here are expert tips on how to evaluate, manage and execute a seamless job-sharing program:

Taking minutes wasn’t getting any easier for Terri Michaels, even after years of practice. “I had become wordy, and the minutes were sometimes eight pages. Each new director or company wanted them done differently,” she says. Finally, she enrolled in a workshop, and things changed. Now she uses these 10 best practices:

Bob Frisch, author of  Who’s In the Room?, says decisions are typically made by the boss consulting with a small group of people—what he calls the “kitchen cabinet.” And everyone knows that when the boss makes big decisions, he turns to this close group.  Here's what's wrong with that...
A records retention schedule ensures that an organization keeps the records it needs for operational, legal, fiscal or historical reasons, and then destroys them when they're no longer useful. You have to know what you have and how long to keep it—legally and for your own business purposes—before you can establish an efficient records management system.
As chief financial officer at Waste Management, Don Flynn raised millions so that the company could acquire hundreds of little haulers and build itself into an empire. When he died in 2011, his baby, LKQ, had $2.5 billion in sales.