Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Q. There’s a professional designation that some people in my industry earn to win promotions into upper management. But it’s a two-year commitment and I’m not sure I need it to move up. Should I bother?
Q. I’ve worked here one year, and I’m struck by the poor quality of management. Is this enough of a reason to leave?
When interviewing for a job, determine whether the hiring manager cares more about “hard” qualifications, such as your technical experience, or “soft” skills, such as your work ethic.
You can’t teach courage. But you can set an example and support your employees’ efforts to succeed in the face of adversity.
In job interviews, you can look candidates in the eye and weigh whether they’d fit at your firm. But that’s hardly a foolproof way to measure integrity.
Fred Abrew, 62, became CEO at Equitable Resources Inc., a Pennsylvania utility company, after nearly 40 years of climbing the corporate ladder. He served as CEO for three years, leaving in 1997 with a “golden parachute” worth $1.35 million. We spoke with Abrew about his steady ascent to the top:
You love your job—at least 80 percent of the time. But you dread certain aspects of it and wind up dwelling on what you hate.
If you notice your otherwise fine manager getting careless or making bad judgments, indirectly raise your concern by admiring a time when the boss didn’t take shortcuts.
When you’re finished explaining what must get done, ask employees, “What’s your first move?”
That’s right—get rid of that silly box.