Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Turn your team into amateur sleuths.
Many middle managers top out because they lack the ability to think like a CEO. For author Constantinos C. Markides, the key to moving up is to develop your strategic thinking.
Q. What’s the best way to make my boss aware of a colleague’s shoddy work? My boss seems oblivious, and it’s affecting my job.
Q. I’m disgusted with some strategic decisions my company’s top executives are making. I think they’re really being stupid. As a lowly manager, my opinion doesn’t carry much weight. What’s the best way for me to sound the alarm?
Tips for putting your best foot forward to get ahead
You know that you should delegate more, but you figure it’s faster and easier to do it yourself. Instructing others takes time, preparation and patience.
Fred Manske Jr. is the president and CEO of Purolator Courier, Canada’s largest distribution company with $1 billion in revenues and 13,000 employees. Yet despite all his power, Manske insists the key to getting ahead is to act like a humble servant.
If you have employees with chronic attendance problems, you can’t rely on company policy to make things easier. Even if you follow the rules and mete out punishment fairly, it’ll still drain your energy and divert you from more important matters.
To learn how your peers or employees perceive you, ask them to pick one area in which you can improve.
You may have a high IQ, but that won’t lift the collective IQ of your colleagues. The best way to make everyone smarter is to let employees exchange ideas without fear.