Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Persevering when you’re struggling through a problem sometimes requires knowing that it can be done. Otherwise, you’re likely to throw up your hands with an exasperated, “It can’t be done.”
Sooner or later, a manager must be the bearer of bad news. If it’s a termination or disciplinary notice, employees may react with anger. To help keep an irate employee under control, you must keep yourself under control. Here are six tips:

By definition, a leader has to be out front. That’s why in hindsight it’s so easy to see how Peter Drucker, the foremost management guru of the 20th century, got off to an early lead: He was ahead of his time.

Employees who lose their jobs have an incentive to sue—and they’ll often look for evidence of discrimination to form the basis of their lawsuits. But to win in court, employees have to show they were meeting their employer’s legitimate expectations. That’s hard to do if the employer can show the employee admitted her shortcomings.

To avoid being a casualty of your own flaws, examine your blind spot. Don’t turn a blind eye to your faults. Seek out frank and frequent feed­­back from work allies who know you well, suggests David Brookmire, president of Corporate Performance Strategies Inc.
When you feel like you’ve hit a wall, consider that you may have landed on an excuse that’s merely disguised as an immovable barrier.
John Chambers, Cisco's CEO, survived both the Internet bubble burst in 2000 and the financial bubble burst in 2008, when so many of his colleagues did not. He refused to let the huge computer company stagnate. Chambers pushed Cisco to innovate in videoconferencing, idea generation and sharing, and acquisitions.
The entitlement mentality comes in all colors of the rainbow, from employees complaining if they have to work late, demanding perks, wanting to be consulted before any workplace change is made, and thinking they can do no wrong. Tips on how to burst employees’ “me me me” bubbles:
Don’t let the big boys shoot down an idea just because it’s new and weird. Another word for “new weirdness” is innovation. Consider Will Wright, the first leader of modern game design. Big companies couldn’t see the point of his game in which nobody “wins,” so Wright joined with two partners and self-published SimCity in 1989. Within a year, the game was a monster hit.
The talent of Jeremy Lin may seem patently clear now. But when Lin was just out of college, no NBA general manager or coach saw his potential. Why didn’t anyone have an inkling of what Lin could do? Stereotypes.