Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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Las Vegas—The most negative opinions you hear at work may be coming from—surprise!—you. Listen closely to what you tell yourself and others, and then slash the negative attitudes that hold you back.

If it's unusually quiet in your office while you're reading this, it's probably the week between Christmas and New Year's, when most businesses slow down.

Las Vegas—If you aren't assertive at work, you're stuck in a dead end, warns Mildred Saunders.

Sherry Turner, Chicago, wanted to apply for a newly created position in her organization that combined three jobs and offered more management duties than her existing admin job did.

Las Vegas—If you asked Linda Eller-bee what she would be doing in five years, she would have gotten the answer wrong throughout her life, she says.

Las Vegas—Issuing snap judgments of those who annoy or irritate you adds to the stress you experience, argues Richard Carlson, author of Don't Sweat the Small Stuff at Work (Hyperion).

In her new book, Contagious Success: Spreading High Performance Throughout Your Organization, Susan Lucia Annunzio identifies three characteristics that "consistently distinguish high-performing workgroups around the world."
Your team is made up of talented people, each of whom can excel individually. But the team's collaboration, decision making, and problem solving aren't what they could be; usually, you end up making the important moves. Why? And what to do about it?
Consultant and author Gerald Kraines, M.D., discusses the differences he sees between companies and leaders that "manage for reality" and those who lead their teams according to fashionable management "fantasies." Which group do you fall in?
Whether you're a new manager or a veteran trying to develop your own team members, it's important to remember: Before you can act like a leader, you need to think like a leader. Here's some advice you can take to heart.