Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

In January, a government panel approved the first major update of Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations since 1991. That move revises the ADA's Accessibility Guidelines, which govern how organizations must ...
Issue: New managers need your help, especially in their first three months. Benefits: Smoother management transitions, and they'll see you as an asset rather than as a nuisance. Action: ...
Thorough background checks can help you defeat any negligent hiring claim.
But what if applicants' background checks come up clean, yet they begin displaying troublesome behavior at your workplace. In ...
HR spending often wildly varies from the senior management's priorities, says a new Watson Wyatt survey. Examples: While managers ranked staff selection second in terms of their priorities, it ranked 36th ...
Issue: Is pursuing a graduate degree worth the effort? If so, which one should you pursue? Benefits: An advanced degree can build your HR and business know-how, plus boost career ...

When meeting with your accountant this tax season, don't be surprised if he or she tries to sell you on a new benefit-
management program or other service.

U.S. workers have stayed put, waiting out the recession. Now, 40 percent of workers plan to change jobs this year, according to a Careerbuilder.com survey. Some tips to lure the best:

Small businesses spend a lot of time and money on employee training, but they rarely measure their return on investment (ROI). And while it's not easy to measure your training ROI, it's important to make sure the money you're spending actually boosts the bottom line.

Companies usually are liable for injuries caused by workers who are "acting within the scope of employment." You're not liable when they cause injuries on their own free time. But what about gray areas, when workers run personal errands while on company business?

You know that some employees slack off at work by cruising the Web. But did you know that some Web sites actively encourage it—and give users ways to deceive their bosses?