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Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

When you terminate employees, make every effort to minimize their embarrassment.
If you’re a team leader who needs to coordinate a group’s activities and meeting times, save yourself hours of hassles by logging online.
Do you treat staff meetings as a chore or as a chance to share ideas?
Q. There’s a professional designation that some people in my industry earn to win promotions into upper management. But it’s a two-year commitment and I’m not sure I need it to move up. Should I bother?
Q. I’ve worked here one year, and I’m struck by the poor quality of management. Is this enough of a reason to leave?
When you claw your way ahead, you’ve got to act like you’re above it all. You can’t let on that you care what your co-workers say about you or do to you. Radiate a low-key intensity so that people underestimate you rather than root for you to fall on your face.
Q. In a meeting with all 120 of our employees, I complained about our poor working conditions. The CEO seemed concerned. But then a few of my co-workers got up to contradict me, claiming everything was fine. What should I do?
When interviewing for a job, determine whether the hiring manager cares more about “hard” qualifications, such as your technical experience, or “soft” skills, such as your work ethic.
In job interviews, you can look candidates in the eye and weigh whether they’d fit at your firm. But that’s hardly a foolproof way to measure integrity.
Fred Abrew, 62, became CEO at Equitable Resources Inc., a Pennsylvania utility company, after nearly 40 years of climbing the corporate ladder. He served as CEO for three years, leaving in 1997 with a “golden parachute” worth $1.35 million. We spoke with Abrew about his steady ascent to the top: