Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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Add a little extra assurance when assigning an important project
Use e-mail as Bill Gates does: to flatten the hierarchy in your department or organization.
Many historians now agree that the late Pope John Paul II was a powerful force behind the fall of communism.
In his later years, Winston Churchill napped every afternoon, leaving these instructions: “Wake me only in the event of a crisis. I define a crisis to be the armed invasion of the British Isles.” The point: Leaders know the difference between a crisis and a routine setback. Do you?
When you occupy the dark-horse position, how can you beat the front-runner? Be quiet, consistent and stick to your message. That’s exactly how Woodrow Wilson won the 1918 Democratic presidential nomination.
Here’s a lesson from John F. Kennedy on how to press on through the din of detractors:
Marie Curie overcame gender bias, poor working conditions, scandal— even a World War—to become one of the most important scientists of the 20th century. Here are a few lessons to take from her struggle:
We’ve all done it: One of your prime people has tentatively accepted another job, so you make a higher counteroffer. Recent research indicates that you might be wasting your time … and money. “Such initiatives rarely are successful,” says management consulting firm Accenture. Prevent people from wanting to leave in the first place by applying these tactics:
School principal Lorraine Monroe had finished a half-hour performance evaluation when the employee stood, paused and said: “I just want to say that if you pass my classroom and see me staring out the window and not teaching, don’t be upset. It’s just that my husband stole my three children yesterday, and I don’t know where he took them.” Monroe sat the woman back down. After a long pause to collect her thoughts, here’s what she said:
Sam Walton opened his first Wal-Mart store in Rogers, Ark., in 1962, the same year that far bigger retailers started Kmart, Woolco and Target. Arkansas was so far off the beaten path, though, that Walton didn’t attract much attention. At least, not until he came from behind and pulled up nose to nose with the big boys. With the benefit of hindsight, it’s interesting to note how simple Walton’s success formula was: