Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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Being a steelworker on a big construction job is literally living on the edge, and that’s right where Ugo “Hokey” Del Costello likes to be. “If I [screw] up,” says the project boss for the massive new Woodrow Wilson Bridge that will connect Maryland and Virginia across the Potomac River, “I could kill somebody.” Despite the extreme nature of his job, Del Costello is a leader in familiar ways:
Neil Armstrong has been described as a “bashful” man with “no ego.” He now lives quietly on a farm in Ohio and could walk down the streets of most U.S. cities without being recognized. But you can’t become the first human to walk on the moon without walking a leadership path straight to the top of your field. Here’s how Armstrong did it:
By daring last year to make the 20th recording of Wagner’s opera Tristan und Isolde, Placido Domingo created an atmosphere of expectation. That’s because he’s a leader in everything he’s done. Aside from being one of the world’s top tenors, Domingo also works as general director of both the Los Angeles and Washington operas and has taken on extra gigs as a conductor. Some clues to his leadership:
Real estate titan Sam Zell has no patience for how business schools teach leadership. He’s candid about how they’re always “canonizing” empirical tools but drop the ball on people skills.
During France’s recent riots, one political figure stood out from the mob: Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy.
You and new Chief Justice John Roberts could probably both learn a lot from the long history of what it takes to lead the U.S. Supreme Court … or any team of unusually independent prima donnas, for that matter.
All the leaders at your organization need to make good decisions. But they also need to adopt a “performance anatomy” that puts those decisions into action. That means being adept at five critical tasks:
Both the New Orleans levee break after Hurricane Katrina and the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 were predictable surprises. That is, they were disasters that could have been prevented. Here are the traits of predictable surprises (with Sept. 11 and Katrina examples), and the steps you can take to keep them from happening:
Sure, leaders are steady and dependable. But they also know the power of doing surprising things when their gut tells them to. Some unexpected actions that yield results:
Use this checklist to recover from a failure and keep moving forward:
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