Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Tap into the young minds on your staff
Ask your vendors to tell you how they can charge you less.
Here’s a process for making ethical decisions. Run through this work sheet if you ever feel queasy about the path you or your organization is about to take.
Wegmans Food Markets recently clinched the #1 spot on Fortune’s “100 Best Companies to Work For” list, after making the list eight times in the past. It turns out that Robert Wegman’s success comes from a renegade philosophy, applied consistently for more than five decades: “Employees come first, customers come second.”
New findings suggest that close-knit teams are often less competitive than teams in which camaraderie is weak. Sociologists at the University of California and elsewhere see some compelling reasons why friendly teams finish last:
Harvard University President Lawrence Summers provides a lesson in what not to do as a leader: alienate your people by telling them they’re probably not genetically equipped to do their jobs.
Lorraine Monroe’s life changed when a teacher encouraged her to run for student office in the fourth grade. That began what was to become Monroe’s lifelong affinity for leadership roles.
Steve Demos, who once practiced Buddhism in a cave, started making tofu in a bathtub and selling it at his tai chi class about 20 years ago. By 2001, his organic food company boasted the nation’s best-selling soy milk: Silk.
Anybody can excel at the tasks they love. People who rise to the top also excel at what they don’t love.
Aside from his unearthly talent with a ball—“any kind of ball,” says a childhood friend—what made former New York Jets quarterback Joe Namath almost unstoppable on the gridiron was his toughness. It came from his three older brothers.