Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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Marketing exec Jeffrey J. Fox doesn’t like the old saying that if you do what you love, success will follow. His view: “Take the job that offers you the most money. If you are in a corporation, always take the transfer, promotion or assignment that pays the most.” Sounds mercenary, until you hear Fox’s rationale:
Many a leader has crashed on the rocks of mergers and acquisitions. That’s because the sirens’ call says that merging two corporate cultures is the “soft stuff.” The hard truth, notes Susan Bowick, who retired last year as an executive vice president at Hewlett- Packard (HP), is that “the soft stuff is the hardest stuff.”
Mocked as “a third-rate Western lawyer” and a “fourth-rate lecturer,” Abraham Lincoln turned out to be a political genius: not because he mastered politics but because of his emotional strengths:
Everybody pays lip service to customer contact. Real leaders actually pick up the phone.
“I can’t get anybody here to work as hard as I do!” That’s a common complaint among managers.
Here’s another installment of the best advice that some of our nation’s top business leaders ever received:
Mackay Envelope Co. CEO Harvey Mackay built his empire by negotiating strategic deals … with paper makers, printers, suppliers. Nearly everything he built involved a deal. Here are Mackay’s six top rules for power dealing:
Former Sunbeam Chairman and CEO Albert Dunlap thinks relying on consensus is a copout.
As you look back over the past few years, can you identify critical projects that you thought about but never started? Can you justify your inaction through lack of time or uncooperative colleagues? If so, you may have caved in to a simple lack of willpower, which two authors of a new book identify as a common leadership problem.
Good managers are rare birds, and great leaders are even rarer, says management consultant Marcus Buckingham. That’s because leaders are unflinchingly, unfailingly optimistic. Here are Buckingham’s three requirements for a great leader: