Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Issue: HR specialists can become emotionally hooked on solving employees' problems. Risk: Resulting emotional overload can sap your time, your energy ...
As New York City mayor, Rudolph Giuliani at least twice found himself considering evenly matched candidates vying for the top spot of an important job. Here’s how he chose without losing good people:
Chances are your new hires get at least some on-the-job training from experienced, high-performing team members. Those same veterans are also often the employees who are chosen to attend advanced training programs, and then asked to share their new knowledge with their colleagues. But are they good trainers?
Almost every organization, regardless of industry, views excellence in customer service as essential to its success. Those customers may not be outsiders: "internal customer service" has become just as important to managers and team leaders.

Scared off from investing by the mutual-fund scandals? You can reap the tax advantages of mutual funds by investing in other tax-advantaged vehicles.

If you or your staff attend trade shows and conferences this year, apply some extra vigilance over what's revealed to clients and prospects. Reason: Your competitors are watching, and your company's closely held secrets and business plans are the most vulnerable at these events.

The federal panel investigating the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks says the private sector is still unprepared for more attacks.

If you have one employee who does all your company's purchasing, look for hints that he or she is skimming off the top or receiving kickbacks from vendors.

Sometimes, you have to accept a setback. But effective leaders know how to cast bad news in the best possible light.
At a pivotal moment in the late 1960s, both presidential candidate Richard Nixon and future presidential candidate Jesse Jackson were saying essentially the same thing.