Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

If you haven’t signed up to receive your monthly Executive Leadership Extra! supplement via e-mail, be sure to visit www.exec-leadership.com/extra today and register
Send the message that you’re action-oriented by replacing ho-hum verbs such as “oversaw” and “headed” on your written correspondence with strong verbs such as “spearheaded,” “broadened,” “delivered,” “developed,” “expanded,” “generated,” “improved,” “innovated” and “maximized.”
It looked like Muhammad Ali was about to meet his match in October 1974 against colossal fighter George Foreman. But he didn’t; Ali took the world heavyweight title away from the heavily favored Foreman—whose thunderous punches, some feared, would permanently injure or even kill Ali—and went on to defend it successfully 10 times.
On the one hand, optimism is the fuel that drives leaders. On the other hand, too much optimism leads to the implosion of big undertakings.
The best way to solve a problem is to go where it’s occurring.

Excellence guru Tom Peters says we learn the most and grow the fastest when we tryout lots of new ideas and kill them immediately if they don’t work out.
Soldier/diplomat Col. Tom Wilhelm came of age during the collapse of communism, cut his teeth in the Balkans and now represents the U.S. military in Mongolia.
SAS Institute, a software company with sales that topped $1 billion in 1999, uses a simple approach to develop products right the first time.
After leading the first U.S. bombing of Japan, within months of Pearl Harbor, Lt. Col. James Doolittle had to ditch his B-25 on a mountaintop in China. Only one of his 16 bombers landed safely. Several fliers died during the mission, and several more were captured and executed. Even though he thought the raid had succeeded—it was, in fact, the first U.S. victory in the Pacific—Doolittle felt he’d failed his men.
Are you a lone ranger in this era of team players?