Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Great leaders generally view fighting as a last resort. But most of them will fight, and fight furiously, once an adversary has pushed them to a point of no return. How do great leaders handle fighting, and how should you? Find some clues in the battle styles of these great presidents:
Take two guys who’ve made it a big part of their “value proposition” to hire military veterans, and you’ve got the basic leadership philosophy at Home Depot. Vets are mature, disciplined leaders, says HR chief Dennis Donovan.
At age 30, Dave Haynes has worked his way up from mowing lawns, driving a bus and supervising water safety to become an international sales rep for Federal Express. Now, he’s exploited his longtime status as a “grunt” in The Peon Book, a new guide for clueless bosses who forget what it’s like on the front lines. Haynes always thought business books “don’t ever give it to managers straight,” so, he wrote one himself. Some Peon highlights:
Knowing when to persist and when to walk is one of the trickier decisions leaders face. Samuel Massie had to do both during his career as a leading American chemist.
Your inspiring idea has already won over your head and heart. But will it make it in the marketplace? Tip the balance in your favor by being ready to answer these questions:
How many leaders personally ride herd on training? Very few. Yet, Andy Grove, former president of Intel and now board chairman, says supervising company training is one of the most important tasks any leader can assume.
Some leaders are overconfident in their own ideas and refuse to listen to others. It’s a leadership trap many people fall into the higher they rise. Here are some effective ways to avoid it:
Lift the spirits of those who are having a bad day by tossing a few encouraging words their way.
Unearth hidden information while negotiating by altering the time line.
Evaluate your people’s aptitude by analyzing the documents they write.