Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

“Leadership is not magnetic personality,” says management guru Peter Drucker.
Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo overshadows what is perhaps his biggest leadership gaffe.
Alexander the Great was a motivational genius and maybe the greatest leader of all time. He knew the names of 10,000 soldiers. He ate, slept and marched with them, choosing to sleep cold and eat little. Yet, even the great Alexander couldn’t push his people too far.
At many organizations, work groups are creating Web log (“Blog”)-style pages so they can easily communicate about projects.
The more you know about the people you lead, the better leader you’re apt to be. Take out a sheet of paper, and answer the following questions about each person who reports to you:
Based on the experiences of men who ran for U.S. president and didn’t make it, here are some lessons on how to recover from failure:
Even when no one around you sees you as a leader, you can be one. That was true of Sacagawea, the lone woman and only Native American on the Lewis and Clark expedition. Although she remains a mystery, here are some of her leadership qualities, unrecognized at the time:
Most of us believe that seeing into the future is impossible. Not so. We actually have a good idea of many things the future holds. We just need to access that knowledge. To do so, take out three sheets of paper. Label them “One year from now,” “Five years from now” and “10 years from now.” On each, answer questions like these:
From the U.S. Marine Corps— leaders by definition, as its members are often the first combatants in a military offensive—here’s a checklist of leadership strategies:
Back in 1952, Sid Caesar was the highest-paid entertainer in America, earning more than $1 million a year for his NBC variety show, “Caesar’s Hour.” But that show brought incredible pressure. On weeks when programs were aired, Caesar and his team locked themselves behind closed doors for days, perfecting every joke and skit.