Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

It happens to top male managers with the best of intentions: You evaluate a poor-performing female employee and, instead of citing her problems straightforwardly, you unknowingly ignore or soft-pedal them. This is a fairly common problem. Research indicates that male managers give female employees performance reviews that are not as forthright as those they give […]
Several applicants over age 40 complained to the EEOC about age bias after they were turned down for admission to a maritime training apprenticeship program. The EEOC sued the program and ...
As part of his age-bias lawsuit, James Halloran claimed that his employer's HR director signed Halloran's signature to the bottom of a negative performance review. At trial, the company admitted to ...
It wasn’t Babe Ruth’s ghost that the Boston Red Sox had to overcome. It was the curse of bad management.
Every leader absorbs important lessons that propel him or her from follower to leader. Here are nuggets of wisdom that several celebrities say helped them reach the top:
Last week, your right-hand person lost a million-dollar account, apparently because he failed to follow up after a customer complained. Do you forgive him or show him the door?
Thomas Edison wanted smart, practical men to help run his empire of inventiveness. (As far as we know, he never hired a woman.) So, he devised a test to measure each applicant’s breadth of reading and knowledge.
“Winnie the Pooh” creator A. A. Milne also wrote serious works of fiction. Yet, his greatest success came from the Pooh books he wrote for his son. Milne considered himself a failure because he didn’t achieve fame the way he wanted.
Richard Fairbank was one of those people who saw beyond the conventional wisdom to an approach that not only built a new business, but a new way of doing business.
The 9/11 Commission’s report on how the United States could have prevented the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon represents a masterpiece in organized thinking.