Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Back in 1952, Sid Caesar was the highest-paid entertainer in America, earning more than $1 million a year for his NBC variety show, “Caesar’s Hour.” But that show brought incredible pressure. On weeks when programs were aired, Caesar and his team locked themselves behind closed doors for days, perfecting every joke and skit.
Sandy Stash was handed an assignment from hell: Atlantic Richfield Co. sent her to Butte, Mont., to manage the cleanup of the nation’s biggest Superfund site, reduce the company’s liability and try to calm everybody’s nerves.
Dennis Donovan describes his style of leadership as being an agent for change. When he joined Home Depot as an executive vice president, his goal was to put a human resources person in every store.
Most of us have had bosses so insecure that they could never let their employees succeed. Jack Winter was such a guy. Fresh out of college, he found himself in Miami Beach on a venerable staff of comedy writers because TV celebrity Jackie Gleason had picked some of his material. As it turned out, Winter didn’t understand Gleason’s humor. What’s worse, Gleason turned out to be a tyrant. Luckily for us, we can use his memories to become better leaders. Some of Winter’s wonders:
A personal symbol can help you stay centered during tough times. Some real-world examples:
You start to think that you have to be perfect to be a leader. You have to set perfect goals, make perfect speeches, arrive at perfect decisions and motivate people perfectly. Not so. Even the greatest leaders have flaws. Sometimes very big flaws. Consider E. B. White, the legendary editor of The New Yorker.
An organization that rewards people lavishly for mediocre work might have a happy work force ... but probably an unexceptional one, too.
Management fads make employees cynical, says coach and consultant Wolf Rinke. They feel used and even abused. Eventually, they develop thick skins so they can stay sane while playing the “Let’s pretend” game during management’s next fad onslaught. To stop the insanity, Rinke points to research showing that four basic, “somewhat nonsexy” practices lead organizations to outperform their peers:
Here’s some advice to aspiring leaders from Jodi Solomon, president of a speakers bureau in Boston:
How effectively are you conveying the image that you strive to build as a leader? To find out, perform this simple test over the next workday: