Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

As a leader, you face decisions, and then you face defining moments when you have to dig down to your core values and choose a certain path.


Good news: Employees in nonunion workplaces no longer can insist on co-workers joining them during investigatory meetings. You can legally deny such employee representation requests thanks to a new National Labor ...
It's not unusual for workers to resist new responsibilities. Sometimes, what drives this resistance is not fatigue or laziness or resentment, but fear — of change and of failure.
If workers want to bring retaliation lawsuits against their employers, they must prove they suffered an "adverse employment action," such as being fired, threatened or denied a promotion. But a court ...
Healthy teams are more productive, and managers can support employee health by creating healthy workplaces. How does yours measure up?
Issue: Several types of valuable HR certifications exist, and new ones emerge all the time, especially in compensation and benefits. Benefit: HR credentials ...
How do you deal with employees who seem to have negative attitudes about every decision you and your teams make? Here's some expert advice:
In his essay “Nature,” American poet and philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson reminds us that we’re surrounded by awe-inspiring beauty every day, yet we rarely take time to recognize and appreciate it.
You probably believe that the best form of negotiating is the win/win style in which everyone gains something. But win/win is probably the worst way for you to negotiate, says negotiating coach Jim Camp. Here’s why:
When President Bush invited the 9/11 Commission into the Oval Office to interview him and Vice President Dick Cheney, he delivered a memorable lesson in the power of controlling the setting of important meetings.