Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

When we joined a highly placed financial exec for lunch at the company cafeteria recently, we learned a leadership lesson when she asked a friendly cashier, “So, what’s on people’s minds today?”
Pythagoras of Samos, who lived in the sixth century B.C., is best remembered for his pioneering studies of the geometry of triangles. He is less well known for his three-part assessment of people, based on his observations of the people who came to Athens to watch the Olympic games.
When Eckhard Cordes took over Mercedes-Benz, he put off all interviews with the press, so he could engage in hard analysis before announcing his sales objectives.
Since winning office two years ago, Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin has shown what it takes to turn crisis into opportunity.
Leadership guru Marshall Goldsmith’s mother taught first grade in Kentucky. In her mind, everybody was a first-grader. Whenever Goldsmith’s father made a grammatical error, she would dish out a stern look and snap: “Bill! Bill!”
You can have all the “vision” in the world, but, unless you can execute your ideas, you’re sunk.
Early on, Neil Armstrong didn’t want to be an astronaut. From a young age, he wanted to design aircraft. He took up flying later because he thought a designer should know how planes work. He became a “stick-and-rudder man.”
As a graduate student at the University of Chicago in 1970, Michael Powell opened a used bookstore after borrowing $3,000. He built shelves, started selling and kept increasing inventory, expanding the shop and adding employees. He repaid the loan.
Whether negotiating a deal or arguing your point, it’s much more effective to emphasize whatever you have in common with your opponent than the differences.
You may think of leaders as achieving incredible success in their careers, but true leadership is actually like a kaleidoscope of brilliant pieces reflecting a dynamic, balanced life.