Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Issue: Sarbanes-Oxley's focus on HR requires you to do more to help your organization comply.
Benefit: Helping your organization meet SarbOx mandates enhances your role as a strategic partner.
"Coaching" doesn't mean telling people what they've done wrong; rather, it's telling your team members what and how they can do right.
Managers have the power to keep our people from being bored. Because we can help our team members see the purpose in what they do—how it helps the team, the enterprise, the world and each of us as individuals. In the battle against workplace boredom, we're the commanders.
You're the leader of a sales team that closes high-value deals every day, and you're justifiably proud of your team's consistent performance. But today, you're in a quandary, after a disturbing conversation with your top salesperson ...
Stay in tune with your people by refusing to multitask when someone pops in your office.
Use a change in weather as an excuse to review your wardrobe.
Bruce Gordon is a leader to keep an eye on. As the new chief exec of the NAACP, he’s the first leader in the organization’s history with a corporate background.
Marketing exec Jeffrey J. Fox doesn’t like the old saying that if you do what you love, success will follow. His view: “Take the job that offers you the most money. If you are in a corporation, always take the transfer, promotion or assignment that pays the most.” Sounds mercenary, until you hear Fox’s rationale:
If you’re lucky, you’re leading a synergistic culture. That means you’re pulling in the same direction as the people in the ranks. If you’re not lucky, you’re leading an antagonistic culture. That means you’re pushing outlooks that most of your people don’t value.
People are afraid to become leaders because the role demands visibility and vulnerability. Even people already in leadership positions often shirk the essential part of their jobs requiring their presence at the front of the pack. It’s impossible to lead without putting yourself out there. To be a leader means: