Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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As an Arizona state senator in 1971, Sandra Day O’Connor began her campaign to have a woman appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. O’Connor had to decide which social conventions to keep and which to toss. She decided to keep wearing dresses, but here are two “rules” she flouted:
You might blame sluggishness, complacency, arrogance or bureaucracy when your organization sinks into deep trouble. All those things matter, but management guru Peter Drucker showed us that none of them may be the main culprit.
Robert Crandall headed engineering and manufacturing at Eastman Kodak during the “copier wars” with Xerox back in the 1970s. He faced two problems:
Most business leaders would rather pay a celebrity $1,000 a minute for a “motivational” talk than bring in somebody who’d actually provide hands-on, tactical training, says Steve Salerno, author of SHAM: How the Self-Help Movement Made America Helpless.
Instead of handing out an agenda, start your next problem-solving meeting by providing nothing more than information about the problem. Then, watch how people process it.
Ralph Waldo Emerson is usually remembered as an American poet and philosopher, not a career-development expert. Yet, the philosophy of self-reliance that Emerson developed with his friend Henry David Thoreau offers a blueprint for accomplishing remarkable things in life.
Growing up in Texas, the young Ross Perot had never seen a ship or an ocean but knew he wanted to attend the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., because his scout leader had gone there. Perot’s buddies couldn’t understand why he was so determined (read: “stubborn”), but he’d made up his mind.
Here’s how an American up-and-comer trained for a senior management job at one of Toyota’s U.S. plants, and the four main lessons his training yielded:
When you have to deliver bad news to your people, follow this protocol that medical doctors use to tell patients about dire prognoses:
Most people think the key to being productive is working flat-out 100 percent of the time. Not so, says John Zenger, former chairman of the Times Mirror Group.
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