Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Issue: The wording used in your employment policies. Risk: Overly vague language makes it difficult for employees to comply and makes you more vulnerable ...
Issue: Should HR question a supervisor's plans to fire an employee? Risk: If you take a termination report at face value, you may overlook bias by a manager. Action: ...
It's hard to find anyone who'll admit to being a "micromanager" — or who'll say anything positive about that breed of manager. But sometimes, we all fit the bill, even when we think we're just being "hands-on" or "engaged" with our teams and their work.
It's not necessarily a bad reflection on you as a manager when one of your team members starts looking for a new job. This is a situation where your skills can really come to the fore — for the employee, the department, the organization, and yourself. Here are the keys to making the most of this situation:
You can help reduce absenteeism with a program of proactive planning.
Leadership researcher Robert Hogan says two-thirds of the people in leadership positions in the Western world will fail. “They will then be fired, demoted or kicked upstairs,” says Hogan.
In his new book, Death by Meeting, Patrick Lencioni actually argues for more meetings than you hold right now: daily five-minute updates, weekly tactical reviews, monthly strategy sessions and quarterly, off-site idea festivals.
While other hotel companies have floundered since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the United States, Marriott has prospered. The reason? Marriott coddles its customers and squeezes its partners.

To astronaut Eileen Collins, leadership consists of four values: technical ability, an understanding of people, openness to new ideas (no big ego allowed), fairness—without even a perception of unfairness.


Offering employees ample pensions and long-term incentives is important, but it can deteriorate into a “prisoner” mind-set. Find immediate rewards for your best people.