Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Even in conversation, Maj. Richard “Dick” Winters shows the leadership traits that made him a key player on D-day and a pivotal character in the HBO World War II series Band of Brothers. Here’s a sampling of how Winters’ careful preparation honed his leadership skills:
A midlevel marketing manager recently flew to London on British Airways. The flight was to land at Heathrow Airport, but a labor dispute on the ground diverted the plane, which circled awhile, then landed at another airport, then sat on the runway, then took off again and landed at Heathrow. The delay chewed up about 90 minutes.
Painter James Rosenquist is recognized as one of the greatest American artists today, a position solidified by recent exhibitions of his work at the Guggenheim Museums in New York and Spain.
Never confuse spontaneity with lack of preparation.
Most people see the good that comes of failure only months or years later. This exercise helps you conduct a “real time” assessment so you can learn from failure right away.
A. J. Wasserstein, CEO of storage and archives management company ArchivesOne, bases his success on a simple principle:
A cross section of salaried employees took part in a planning session for a big chemical company in Tennessee. Marilyn was the least senior and least knowledgeable employee and the only woman in the group whose task was to figure out how to cut skyrocketing railroad-transport costs.
First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt occasionally found herself embroiled in controversy. Within weeks of decrying the practice of racially segregated seating in Alabama, she intervened in another racial spat.
Leaders let other people know what they stand for. In other words, they make their values explicit. Here’s how to develop your values and communicate them with conviction:
Take these three steps to measure your next job offer and make sure your transition runs smoothly: