Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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What is the business world going to be like in the future? Not tomorrow, but in 15 years or so?That's the subject of a recent report out of Australia, con­ducted by Boston Consulting Group for a government workforce-develop­ment effort, looking at the skills senior managers will need in 2020.
Kathy and Alan have drifted into a common work­place scenario, where they don't communicate like adults about the work to be done. Instead, they bargain like kids, or like parents and kids—they take turns making demands and then giving in to each other. This cycle of bargaining includes a large element of manipulation, and it's very stressful for everyone involved.
Workplace bullying has in recent years been the focus of vocal and highly organized campaigns to stop it, by passing new laws and building public awareness. It's become a big and visible issue in many workplaces. Here's some advice for managers:
Flextime sounded like a good idea at the time, right? Has it become a head­ache for you to keep track of—let alone supervise—your employees with flexible schedules? Has your flexibility turned into a free-for-all? Here's some expert advice on how to make flextime work:
The IRS can hit you with dozens of different penalties if you fail to follow the letter of the tax law. They’re often arcane and difficult to understand. And although many of the penalties are relatively small on their own, they can add up quickly. So, a single mistake could snowball into hundreds or thousands of dollars.
“I’m from the government, and I’m here to help.” It may be the punch line to an old joke, but it can also be a valuable message that small business owners overlook.
It would have been easy for helicopter pilot Hugh Thompson Jr. to fly away from the scene of carnage. But he and his crew—appalled when they came upon their fellow U.S. troops killing civilians in the Vietnamese village of My Lai— landed their helicopter between the shooting soldiers and fleeing villagers, pointed their guns at the Americans and told them to stop firing.
So, can leadership be taught? Jay Conger, executive director of the University of Southern California’s Leadership Institute, had his doubts. He embarked on a two-year study to find out.
Avoid falling prey to the most common lie leaders tell themselves
Prepare for the next crisis— or opportunity—by employing “active waiting”: