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Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

After summer vacations end, call your team together for a special meeting to review priorities and set projects for the fall and winter.

The little scrape on the corner of your desk. The run in your stocking or the tiny spot on your tie. The minor typo on the fourth page of your report. The whiff on your breath that tells people you had wine with lunch.


Grease the wheels for feedback at your next meeting with these four words: “What do you think?”
When John H. Johnson launched Ebony in 1945, it quickly became such a success that he could barely print copies fast enough to keep it on newsstands. Yet, the magazine aimed at African-Americans made little money because white-owned companies refused to advertise in it.
When Arthur Gaston found himself working at a coal and iron mine in Alabama after World War I, he wondered how on earth he’d ever get ahead. At a time when college graduates couldn’t find jobs, Gaston didn’t even have a high school diploma.
IBM founder Thomas Watson Sr. was much more than a wildly successful businessman:  He was a seer.
He was smart: He studied law and passed the bar in six months. He was honorable: He never spoke a word against his wife after a mysterious marital blowup that ended his career as Tennessee governor. He was brave: His mother exhorted him not to disgrace the musket she gave him, and he never did.
First, he cracked the code of wave physics and created the perfect synthetic wave. Now, he’s designed a surf park opening in Orlando next year that will provide eight-foot, Oahu-style waves with the flick of a credit card.
In 1976, rebel forces kidnapped Bill Niehous, general manager of Owens-Illinois’ Venezuelan operations, and held him in the jungle for three years before he escaped.
Bob Lutz, the automotive wizard who championed the Dodge Viper and Pontiac’s new GTO, hates “windy” business language. To cut down on the jargon and sound more like a down-to-earth leader, say: