Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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When researching and collecting data about toxic workplaces, which eventually led to his co-authoring the book Rising Above a Toxic Workplace, Paul White discovered three distinct symptoms of a toxic workplace:
When you think of troublesome types, the social butterflies in your office might not come to mind. After all, their friendly, bubbly natures liven up the workplace. Still, they can cause some problems.
Don't let fear and worry derail your projects just as they are beginning. Create a “worry list” the next time your team takes on a new task or project.
What do you do when employees’ personal issues are affecting their work performance? While understandably you may not want to discuss personal issues with employees, you can’t ignore them.
If fears of up to half of your best workers packing up and leaving aren’t keeping you awake at night—maybe they should be. You should be talking to your best workers to discover how to keep them aboard.
Ask yourself the three things T. Boone Pickens does ... Beware the trappings of success ... Be aware that leadership is just as important as ever.
When David Cote became Honeywell’s CEO in 2002, it was in disarray. And so he listed 12 behaviors that he wanted everyone to follow. He felt that unifying the company around the be­­haviors would work better than articulating vague, hard-to-measure values.

After years of steep losses, Thomas Cook Group earned a profit with Harriet Green at the helm. When she became the struggling British travel company’s CEO in July 2012, it was burning through cash. Her turnaround strategy: Make decisive decisions, quickly.

To gather market intelligence and grapple with your industry’s ever-changing competitive landscape, you can’t sit at your desk. You need to expand your network and keep probing to learn more from others.

The hole left when an outstanding employee departs can seem big enough to swallow up the productivity of that person’s whole department. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Here are four tips to maintain order and productivity when a top employee moves on