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Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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Managers spend a lot of time assigning tasks, then stressing about how employees carry out the tasks and whether each one is completed on time. Mavenlink is an app that makes project management a lot more convenient.

Some managers tend to evaluate team members based on their most recent positive or negative encounter. This hap­pens most often when a manager has no record of an employee’s performance over the past months or year. It’s not a good way to conduct a review, and it’s not fair to the employee. An increasingly popular and easily imple­mented solution is to create an employee performance log.

You probably wouldn’t be where you are professionally if it weren’t for an attentive boss who took an interest and recognized your special talents. Now it’s time to pass that favor along by recognizing and cultivating talent among your own employees. Here’s how:

With some 1.5 million Americans affected by Parkinson’s disease and about 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year, chances are you may manage someone with this motor system disorder during your career.
At her death in 1980, Jacqueline Cochran held more speed, altitude and distance records than any other pilot in aviation history. But it wasn’t her precociousness that turned Cochran into a force in American history. It was her guts.
With his famous optimism, risk-taking and hatred of compromise, President Woodrow Wilson went for maximum outcomes. He failed big and won big.
One of the most tested models for changing behavior assumes five stages of change: pre-contemplation, contemplation, preparation, action and maintenance. The idea is not to hurry or skip stages. You need each stage to move to the next one.

Sometimes, leaders must resort to subterfuge. That’s what Samuel Adams and other colonists did to whip up hostility against the English in the late 1760s. One of Adams’ tools was a news service reporting the misdeeds of the British troops in Boston, cooking up charges true and false when the situation got bad enough to incite war.

Leaders with emotional intelligence rarely possess it by accident. Their high self-awareness lets them see cause-effect relationships between their feelings and their actions. To raise your awareness, keep daily notes of your actions—and the thoughts that led to those actions.
Stanford professor Bob Sutton regards leadership as an expression of comedy and tragedy. For instance, he has said that good leaders know when to be boring, vague, emotionally detached and authoritarian. In a recent interview, he was asked when boredom might be desirable.
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